webOS hxcpp on webOS tablet?

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webOS hxcpp on webOS tablet?

Alex Liebert
Hey Joshua,

I've been dragging my feet a bit on picking up a Palm device, but I was wondering if you've been exposed to the tablet apis from WebOS and if you expect the TouchPad tablet to be compatible with hxcpp webos?

Thanks!

Alex

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: webOS hxcpp on webOS tablet?

singmajesty
Yeah!

I've run all my existing applications on the TouchPad, as well as the demo  
I posted recently on my blog:


http://www.joshuagranick.com/blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-with-flash-webos-haxe-and-actuate/


It still supports the accelerometer, minimizing to card view and some of  
the other APIs I supported previously. Out of the box, if you compile it  
will work for every webOS device in existence. You can handle the stage  
size differently to introduce logic for going as small as 320 x 400 for  
the Veer or Pixi and 1024 x 768 for the TouchPad.

If you run into APIs you need access to that aren't readily available in  
HXCPP already, let me know and I'll see if I can wire it up



On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 12:55:33 -0700, Alex Liebert  
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hey Joshua,
>
> I've been dragging my feet a bit on picking up a Palm device, but I was
> wondering if you've been exposed to the tablet apis from WebOS and if you
> expect the TouchPad tablet to be compatible with hxcpp webos?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Alex


--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: webOS hxcpp on webOS tablet?

Alex Liebert
That's awesome!  I didn't know you could pick one up yet (developer program?)  Have you tried the iOS target at all for nme or just focused on webos?

On Fri, Jun 17, 2011 at 1:25 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Yeah!

I've run all my existing applications on the TouchPad, as well as the demo I posted recently on my blog:


http://www.joshuagranick.com/blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-with-flash-webos-haxe-and-actuate/


It still supports the accelerometer, minimizing to card view and some of the other APIs I supported previously. Out of the box, if you compile it will work for every webOS device in existence. You can handle the stage size differently to introduce logic for going as small as 320 x 400 for the Veer or Pixi and 1024 x 768 for the TouchPad.

If you run into APIs you need access to that aren't readily available in HXCPP already, let me know and I'll see if I can wire it up




On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 12:55:33 -0700, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hey Joshua,

I've been dragging my feet a bit on picking up a Palm device, but I was
wondering if you've been exposed to the tablet apis from WebOS and if you
expect the TouchPad tablet to be compatible with hxcpp webos?

Thanks!

Alex


--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: webOS hxcpp on webOS tablet?

singmajesty
Hey Alex,

I haven't tried iOS with NME, but I saw it running when I met Tarwin  
Stroh-Spijer, and it seemed solid.

The two biggest barriers to entry for HXCPP and NME right now, in my  
opinion, are the number of steps it takes to set up a development  
environment, and the edge-cases where the libraries don't work out of the  
box.

The improvements I made to support webOS haven't all made it upstream. For  
now, I still have my own repository. It should work out of the box for  
Linux, Mac or Windows, but I have had much more trouble compiling for  
Android -- much of that being an issue with the Android developer tools  
themselves, or their approach to C/C++ support on the platform.

I started work at Palm (under HP) in developer relations, specifically for  
the "PDK" for C/C++ applications. A lot of people I meet get excited about  
haXe. I hope that we can work through the barriers of entry so haXe, HXCPP  
and NME can shine and not fall into obscurity. These libraries have a big  
head-start on Adobe AIR right now -- there's no reason why more people  
shouldn't be excited about the project.

Look at this benchmark:

http://blog.krozalski.com/?p=1

I think the future is bright, but simplifying setup (not requiring a  
separate dev repository, for example) and expanding OS support (Linux host  
+ Android target blows up, for example) can make a huge difference. Then  
we just need to show the world that haXe deserves to be a household name ;)


On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 13:34:44 -0700, Alex Liebert  
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> That's awesome!  I didn't know you could pick one up yet (developer
> program?)  Have you tried the iOS target at all for nme or just focused  
> on
> webos?
>
> On Fri, Jun 17, 2011 at 1:25 PM, Joshua Granick
> <[hidden email]>wrote:
>
>> Yeah!
>>
>> I've run all my existing applications on the TouchPad, as well as the  
>> demo
>> I posted recently on my blog:
>>
>>
>> http://www.joshuagranick.com/**blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-**
>> with-flash-webos-haxe-and-**actuate/<http://www.joshuagranick.com/blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-with-flash-webos-haxe-and-actuate/>
>>
>>
>> It still supports the accelerometer, minimizing to card view and some of
>> the other APIs I supported previously. Out of the box, if you compile it
>> will work for every webOS device in existence. You can handle the stage  
>> size
>> differently to introduce logic for going as small as 320 x 400 for the  
>> Veer
>> or Pixi and 1024 x 768 for the TouchPad.
>>
>> If you run into APIs you need access to that aren't readily available in
>> HXCPP already, let me know and I'll see if I can wire it up
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 12:55:33 -0700, Alex Liebert <
>> [hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>  Hey Joshua,
>>>
>>> I've been dragging my feet a bit on picking up a Palm device, but I was
>>> wondering if you've been exposed to the tablet apis from WebOS and if  
>>> you
>>> expect the TouchPad tablet to be compatible with hxcpp webos?
>>>
>>> Thanks!
>>>
>>> Alex
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
>>
>> --
>> haXe - an open source web programming language
>> http://haxe.org
>>


--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: webOS hxcpp on webOS tablet?

Alex Liebert
I'm with you completely.  I've had success recently building for both Android and iOS, with the new NME from source.  The real barrier there was getting the libraries themselves building since I'm pretty much a C++ dummy.  I think the new NME2 build system is a great improvement though, so when there's a binary release it will be much easier to get new people started.  At that point, building nme2 projects for varying platforms will not be any harder then doing the same with the free Adobe AIR toolkit.

I see a few barriers myself.  On one side, I've worked for a pretty big company that has a large codebase of Actionscript 3 supporting a front end for a virtual world.  In that context, it's hard to sell haXe to management because haXe is still unproven, and requires doing a port from AS3.  The sweetest lure is NME as an AIR alternative.

I'd say the strategy for expanding haXe is better served by looking at what's happened with Unity over the past few years.  They aggressively targeted independent developers with 'learn something new, get 3D and support for mobile phones, plus strong documentation and community.'  Big dev houses (EA, Nickelodeon) followed suit after the platform developed and proved itself on the enthusiasm of independent devs.

In my mind, we need to get some commercially visible products on the market using haXe and build up some buzz around that.  Increasing the user base is then a function of making our community more friendly accessible to people, through some marketing, updating the website, and the documentation.

I also agree that the future is bright :) I'm incredibly pleased with the performance I get out of NME today on mobile platforms.

On the Android front, I got everything going well with nme2 from source, at least on windows, based on Hugh's instructions on gamehaxe.com.  Let me know if you're interested and have a stumbling point and maybe I can help!

On Sat, Jun 18, 2011 at 11:41 AM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hey Alex,

I haven't tried iOS with NME, but I saw it running when I met Tarwin Stroh-Spijer, and it seemed solid.

The two biggest barriers to entry for HXCPP and NME right now, in my opinion, are the number of steps it takes to set up a development environment, and the edge-cases where the libraries don't work out of the box.

The improvements I made to support webOS haven't all made it upstream. For now, I still have my own repository. It should work out of the box for Linux, Mac or Windows, but I have had much more trouble compiling for Android -- much of that being an issue with the Android developer tools themselves, or their approach to C/C++ support on the platform.

I started work at Palm (under HP) in developer relations, specifically for the "PDK" for C/C++ applications. A lot of people I meet get excited about haXe. I hope that we can work through the barriers of entry so haXe, HXCPP and NME can shine and not fall into obscurity. These libraries have a big head-start on Adobe AIR right now -- there's no reason why more people shouldn't be excited about the project.

Look at this benchmark:

http://blog.krozalski.com/?p=1

I think the future is bright, but simplifying setup (not requiring a separate dev repository, for example) and expanding OS support (Linux host + Android target blows up, for example) can make a huge difference. Then we just need to show the world that haXe deserves to be a household name ;)



On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 13:34:44 -0700, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:

That's awesome!  I didn't know you could pick one up yet (developer
program?)  Have you tried the iOS target at all for nme or just focused on
webos?

On Fri, Jun 17, 2011 at 1:25 PM, Joshua Granick
<[hidden email]>wrote:

Yeah!

I've run all my existing applications on the TouchPad, as well as the demo
I posted recently on my blog:


http://www.joshuagranick.com/**blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-**
with-flash-webos-haxe-and-**actuate/<http://www.joshuagranick.com/blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-with-flash-webos-haxe-and-actuate/>



It still supports the accelerometer, minimizing to card view and some of
the other APIs I supported previously. Out of the box, if you compile it
will work for every webOS device in existence. You can handle the stage size
differently to introduce logic for going as small as 320 x 400 for the Veer
or Pixi and 1024 x 768 for the TouchPad.

If you run into APIs you need access to that aren't readily available in
HXCPP already, let me know and I'll see if I can wire it up




On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 12:55:33 -0700, Alex Liebert <
[hidden email]> wrote:

 Hey Joshua,

I've been dragging my feet a bit on picking up a Palm device, but I was
wondering if you've been exposed to the tablet apis from WebOS and if you
expect the TouchPad tablet to be compatible with hxcpp webos?

Thanks!

Alex



--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org



--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: webOS hxcpp on webOS tablet?

Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
I really think that the biggest barrier for getting excitement about NME / hxcpp is good simple tutorials, that just work out of the box. It isn't that there isn't these tutorials, but there's always so much work (and problems) with setting up a working dev environment that it puts people off.

Something like the one button demo that you get with jQuery always sells that to people! I know that CPP can generally be a bit annoying (especially) on windows but it needs to be seamless ie actually work as described! 

I think we also need to be weary when writing tutorials that we always include exact versions and links to those versions of libraries so things don't break over time.

We are very close to being able to convince AS3 devs (which there are many) to simply switch over but there are these few problems left. Server side is one area that works pretty well out of the box already and I've been AS3 devs use haxe specifically for that so they don't need to learn PHP!

Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: +61 3 8060 5321
_______________________


On Sun, Jun 19, 2011 at 5:36 AM, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm with you completely.  I've had success recently building for both Android and iOS, with the new NME from source.  The real barrier there was getting the libraries themselves building since I'm pretty much a C++ dummy.  I think the new NME2 build system is a great improvement though, so when there's a binary release it will be much easier to get new people started.  At that point, building nme2 projects for varying platforms will not be any harder then doing the same with the free Adobe AIR toolkit.

I see a few barriers myself.  On one side, I've worked for a pretty big company that has a large codebase of Actionscript 3 supporting a front end for a virtual world.  In that context, it's hard to sell haXe to management because haXe is still unproven, and requires doing a port from AS3.  The sweetest lure is NME as an AIR alternative.

I'd say the strategy for expanding haXe is better served by looking at what's happened with Unity over the past few years.  They aggressively targeted independent developers with 'learn something new, get 3D and support for mobile phones, plus strong documentation and community.'  Big dev houses (EA, Nickelodeon) followed suit after the platform developed and proved itself on the enthusiasm of independent devs.

In my mind, we need to get some commercially visible products on the market using haXe and build up some buzz around that.  Increasing the user base is then a function of making our community more friendly accessible to people, through some marketing, updating the website, and the documentation.

I also agree that the future is bright :) I'm incredibly pleased with the performance I get out of NME today on mobile platforms.

On the Android front, I got everything going well with nme2 from source, at least on windows, based on Hugh's instructions on gamehaxe.com.  Let me know if you're interested and have a stumbling point and maybe I can help!


On Sat, Jun 18, 2011 at 11:41 AM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hey Alex,

I haven't tried iOS with NME, but I saw it running when I met Tarwin Stroh-Spijer, and it seemed solid.

The two biggest barriers to entry for HXCPP and NME right now, in my opinion, are the number of steps it takes to set up a development environment, and the edge-cases where the libraries don't work out of the box.

The improvements I made to support webOS haven't all made it upstream. For now, I still have my own repository. It should work out of the box for Linux, Mac or Windows, but I have had much more trouble compiling for Android -- much of that being an issue with the Android developer tools themselves, or their approach to C/C++ support on the platform.

I started work at Palm (under HP) in developer relations, specifically for the "PDK" for C/C++ applications. A lot of people I meet get excited about haXe. I hope that we can work through the barriers of entry so haXe, HXCPP and NME can shine and not fall into obscurity. These libraries have a big head-start on Adobe AIR right now -- there's no reason why more people shouldn't be excited about the project.

Look at this benchmark:

http://blog.krozalski.com/?p=1

I think the future is bright, but simplifying setup (not requiring a separate dev repository, for example) and expanding OS support (Linux host + Android target blows up, for example) can make a huge difference. Then we just need to show the world that haXe deserves to be a household name ;)



On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 13:34:44 -0700, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:

That's awesome!  I didn't know you could pick one up yet (developer
program?)  Have you tried the iOS target at all for nme or just focused on
webos?

On Fri, Jun 17, 2011 at 1:25 PM, Joshua Granick
<[hidden email]>wrote:

Yeah!

I've run all my existing applications on the TouchPad, as well as the demo
I posted recently on my blog:


http://www.joshuagranick.com/**blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-**
with-flash-webos-haxe-and-**actuate/<http://www.joshuagranick.com/blog/2011/05/12/having-fun-with-flash-webos-haxe-and-actuate/>



It still supports the accelerometer, minimizing to card view and some of
the other APIs I supported previously. Out of the box, if you compile it
will work for every webOS device in existence. You can handle the stage size
differently to introduce logic for going as small as 320 x 400 for the Veer
or Pixi and 1024 x 768 for the TouchPad.

If you run into APIs you need access to that aren't readily available in
HXCPP already, let me know and I'll see if I can wire it up




On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 12:55:33 -0700, Alex Liebert <
[hidden email]> wrote:

 Hey Joshua,

I've been dragging my feet a bit on picking up a Palm device, but I was
wondering if you've been exposed to the tablet apis from WebOS and if you
expect the TouchPad tablet to be compatible with hxcpp webos?

Thanks!

Alex



--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org



--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org