large haXe game projects with flash target

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large haXe game projects with flash target

Kevin Koechley
Hi,

This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!  

I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust games in haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.

I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe? 

thoughts?

thanks!

Kevin

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Rob Fell
Welcome Kevin, we're happy you're here!

With regards to your question, may I ask how you define "bigger more
complex games"?  E.g. large codebase, large team size, large budget,
large audience, large timeline, large filesize ;-) etc.  Can you give
numbers?

Imo, the challenge for team / agile scale projects remains clear
separation of concerns and, for SWF target especially, the ability to
runtime load what each dev / designer / team is working on into the
current iteration (considering each may have independent backlogs &
toolsets etc).  For myself and team, we have found haXe to be >= AS3 in
most scenarios (first impression & recruitment keyword volume being the
exceptions).

If you have specific questions on workflow please do ask and I'm sure
you'll receive a good range of high grade suggestions from members of
this list.

Best regards, Rob

PS. I'm not sure if it qualifies as big or complex but one of the recent
haXe games deployed was:
http://starwars.lego.com/en-us/games/aceassault/default.aspx



On 11:59 AM, Kevin Koechley wrote:

> Hi,
>
> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>
> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we
> should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are
> any other game companies that are building large, robust games in
> haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development
> with large teams.
>
> I've already seen the showcase on the website (
> http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody
> building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>
> thoughts?
>
> thanks!
>
> Kevin

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Kevin Koechley
Hi Rob!

Thanks for the link, and the info.  This is EXACTLY what i was looking for!  The only examples i could find were whack-a-mole type things, which doesn't really sell the technology to those that haven't ever heard of it and are nervous about making the switch.

Your game is AWESOME!  This should really help put people's minds here at ease.  

As for numbers and things, that remains to be seen, but we just got 5 million dollars in funding to build a game company and we haven't written a line of code yet.  I really think that your game ( with big brands as well as cool gameplay) will help sell the execs on the potential of haXe.

I'm looking forward to working more with this technology, and am excited about the community growing ( at least by one here).  :)

cheers,

Kevin

On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:52 PM, Rob Fell wrote:

> Welcome Kevin, we're happy you're here!
>
> With regards to your question, may I ask how you define "bigger more complex games"?  E.g. large codebase, large team size, large budget, large audience, large timeline, large filesize ;-) etc.  Can you give numbers?
>
> Imo, the challenge for team / agile scale projects remains clear separation of concerns and, for SWF target especially, the ability to runtime load what each dev / designer / team is working on into the current iteration (considering each may have independent backlogs & toolsets etc).  For myself and team, we have found haXe to be >= AS3 in most scenarios (first impression & recruitment keyword volume being the exceptions).
>
> If you have specific questions on workflow please do ask and I'm sure you'll receive a good range of high grade suggestions from members of this list.
>
> Best regards, Rob
>
> PS. I'm not sure if it qualifies as big or complex but one of the recent haXe games deployed was: http://starwars.lego.com/en-us/games/aceassault/default.aspx
>
>
>
> On 11:59 AM, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust games in haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>
>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
Yeah, it really is the run-time loading of objects that will concern you with a large project as stated above. If you're ONLY targeting AS3 then nothing is different between using haxe and straight as3 anyway, as you'll like just use the as3 methods and use them in the same way as you would there.

If you've got a large budget like this and you're interested in other targets ie CPP (iPhone etc) then I'd suggest investing in creating some libraries that play well with asset loading on the fly with both targets, and maybe even look at getting a haxe expert on board to help you out as well in the early stages to scope these kinds of things.

Really though, shouldn't be any different than a good as3 project, haxe will just help you out a little, let you have more control and hopefully code more cleanly which should help.


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: +61 3 8060 5321
_______________________


On Sat, Aug 13, 2011 at 1:29 PM, Kevin Koechley <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Rob!

Thanks for the link, and the info.  This is EXACTLY what i was looking for!  The only examples i could find were whack-a-mole type things, which doesn't really sell the technology to those that haven't ever heard of it and are nervous about making the switch.

Your game is AWESOME!  This should really help put people's minds here at ease.

As for numbers and things, that remains to be seen, but we just got 5 million dollars in funding to build a game company and we haven't written a line of code yet.  I really think that your game ( with big brands as well as cool gameplay) will help sell the execs on the potential of haXe.

I'm looking forward to working more with this technology, and am excited about the community growing ( at least by one here).  :)

cheers,

Kevin

On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:52 PM, Rob Fell wrote:

> Welcome Kevin, we're happy you're here!
>
> With regards to your question, may I ask how you define "bigger more complex games"?  E.g. large codebase, large team size, large budget, large audience, large timeline, large filesize ;-) etc.  Can you give numbers?
>
> Imo, the challenge for team / agile scale projects remains clear separation of concerns and, for SWF target especially, the ability to runtime load what each dev / designer / team is working on into the current iteration (considering each may have independent backlogs & toolsets etc).  For myself and team, we have found haXe to be >= AS3 in most scenarios (first impression & recruitment keyword volume being the exceptions).
>
> If you have specific questions on workflow please do ask and I'm sure you'll receive a good range of high grade suggestions from members of this list.
>
> Best regards, Rob
>
> PS. I'm not sure if it qualifies as big or complex but one of the recent haXe games deployed was: http://starwars.lego.com/en-us/games/aceassault/default.aspx
>
>
>
> On 11:59 AM, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust games in haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>
>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Alex Liebert
On the issue of asset version control, I've found the new development work on SVN to be pretty streamlined for this; the nmml format is a nice way to keep your asset definitions separate, and it can be edited by a buildscript on the fly.  Actual runtime dynamic assets is indeed another issue though.

Where is your company located?

Best,

Alex Liebert
Milkman Games, LLC
twitter: @milkmangames

On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 8:39 AM, Tarwin Stroh-Spijer <[hidden email]> wrote:
Yeah, it really is the run-time loading of objects that will concern you with a large project as stated above. If you're ONLY targeting AS3 then nothing is different between using haxe and straight as3 anyway, as you'll like just use the as3 methods and use them in the same way as you would there.

If you've got a large budget like this and you're interested in other targets ie CPP (iPhone etc) then I'd suggest investing in creating some libraries that play well with asset loading on the fly with both targets, and maybe even look at getting a haxe expert on board to help you out as well in the early stages to scope these kinds of things.

Really though, shouldn't be any different than a good as3 project, haxe will just help you out a little, let you have more control and hopefully code more cleanly which should help.


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: <a href="tel:%2B61%203%208060%205321" value="+61380605321" target="_blank">+61 3 8060 5321
_______________________



On Sat, Aug 13, 2011 at 1:29 PM, Kevin Koechley <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Rob!

Thanks for the link, and the info.  This is EXACTLY what i was looking for!  The only examples i could find were whack-a-mole type things, which doesn't really sell the technology to those that haven't ever heard of it and are nervous about making the switch.

Your game is AWESOME!  This should really help put people's minds here at ease.

As for numbers and things, that remains to be seen, but we just got 5 million dollars in funding to build a game company and we haven't written a line of code yet.  I really think that your game ( with big brands as well as cool gameplay) will help sell the execs on the potential of haXe.

I'm looking forward to working more with this technology, and am excited about the community growing ( at least by one here).  :)

cheers,

Kevin

On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:52 PM, Rob Fell wrote:

> Welcome Kevin, we're happy you're here!
>
> With regards to your question, may I ask how you define "bigger more complex games"?  E.g. large codebase, large team size, large budget, large audience, large timeline, large filesize ;-) etc.  Can you give numbers?
>
> Imo, the challenge for team / agile scale projects remains clear separation of concerns and, for SWF target especially, the ability to runtime load what each dev / designer / team is working on into the current iteration (considering each may have independent backlogs & toolsets etc).  For myself and team, we have found haXe to be >= AS3 in most scenarios (first impression & recruitment keyword volume being the exceptions).
>
> If you have specific questions on workflow please do ask and I'm sure you'll receive a good range of high grade suggestions from members of this list.
>
> Best regards, Rob
>
> PS. I'm not sure if it qualifies as big or complex but one of the recent haXe games deployed was: http://starwars.lego.com/en-us/games/aceassault/default.aspx
>
>
>
> On 11:59 AM, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust games in haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>
>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

sventunus
Also, let's not forget the superb haXe compiler that is still a sweet step up from the Adobe compilers, even if you're just targeting AS3.
Honesty obliges me to say that I haven't yet compared the bytecode that the haXe compiler generates vs AS3 compiled through Adobe with a second pass through Apparat.
But in any case a haXe-compiled SWF will be more efficient than an Adobe-compiled SWF. So if you have that advantage up-front, then why not learn how to program haXe instead of AS3 (or transition to it)? It's not a big change, it enforces better programming principles, ánd it offers you more deployment options.

What asset loading is concerned (or any other aspect of maintainability in a large-scale software project): this and any other relevant aspects can be tackled in any programming language as you probably know. Whether it be AS3, haXe, C#, Java, C++ or even plain old simple C. It all comes down to how you set up things, your knowledge and familiarity with the tools you're working with.

If your doubt is really only between haXe and AS3, then doubt not! Go with haXe for the reasons others & I mentioned, and sell it to your bosses with the promise of wider deployments and more efficient bytecode! You may feel "little" as a dev sometimes in a larger company, and think that you don't have much of a say in how your company wants to do things... But never forget: YOU are the dev. It is YOUR task to get a job done in a certain amount of time, and to do it in the best possible way. The people you have to account to generally don't know sh*t about the technology you use to get that job done as efficiently as possible, and it's not their job to know that neither. So step up for yourself, even if you're "just" a dev. Throw in some mojo, tell 'em this is how things are going to be done and why, deliver, and let the PM's get their share of the cake And everyone will be happy, including you :-)

/* END OF HAXE EVANGELISM TRANSMISSION */   ;-)

Sven

On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 9:34 PM, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:
On the issue of asset version control, I've found the new development work on SVN to be pretty streamlined for this; the nmml format is a nice way to keep your asset definitions separate, and it can be edited by a buildscript on the fly.  Actual runtime dynamic assets is indeed another issue though.

Where is your company located?

Best,

Alex Liebert
Milkman Games, LLC
twitter: @milkmangames

On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 8:39 AM, Tarwin Stroh-Spijer <[hidden email]> wrote:
Yeah, it really is the run-time loading of objects that will concern you with a large project as stated above. If you're ONLY targeting AS3 then nothing is different between using haxe and straight as3 anyway, as you'll like just use the as3 methods and use them in the same way as you would there.

If you've got a large budget like this and you're interested in other targets ie CPP (iPhone etc) then I'd suggest investing in creating some libraries that play well with asset loading on the fly with both targets, and maybe even look at getting a haxe expert on board to help you out as well in the early stages to scope these kinds of things.

Really though, shouldn't be any different than a good as3 project, haxe will just help you out a little, let you have more control and hopefully code more cleanly which should help.


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: <a href="tel:%2B61%203%208060%205321" value="+61380605321" target="_blank">+61 3 8060 5321
_______________________



On Sat, Aug 13, 2011 at 1:29 PM, Kevin Koechley <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Rob!

Thanks for the link, and the info.  This is EXACTLY what i was looking for!  The only examples i could find were whack-a-mole type things, which doesn't really sell the technology to those that haven't ever heard of it and are nervous about making the switch.

Your game is AWESOME!  This should really help put people's minds here at ease.

As for numbers and things, that remains to be seen, but we just got 5 million dollars in funding to build a game company and we haven't written a line of code yet.  I really think that your game ( with big brands as well as cool gameplay) will help sell the execs on the potential of haXe.

I'm looking forward to working more with this technology, and am excited about the community growing ( at least by one here).  :)

cheers,

Kevin

On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:52 PM, Rob Fell wrote:

> Welcome Kevin, we're happy you're here!
>
> With regards to your question, may I ask how you define "bigger more complex games"?  E.g. large codebase, large team size, large budget, large audience, large timeline, large filesize ;-) etc.  Can you give numbers?
>
> Imo, the challenge for team / agile scale projects remains clear separation of concerns and, for SWF target especially, the ability to runtime load what each dev / designer / team is working on into the current iteration (considering each may have independent backlogs & toolsets etc).  For myself and team, we have found haXe to be >= AS3 in most scenarios (first impression & recruitment keyword volume being the exceptions).
>
> If you have specific questions on workflow please do ask and I'm sure you'll receive a good range of high grade suggestions from members of this list.
>
> Best regards, Rob
>
> PS. I'm not sure if it qualifies as big or complex but one of the recent haXe games deployed was: http://starwars.lego.com/en-us/games/aceassault/default.aspx
>
>
>
> On 11:59 AM, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust games in haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>
>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
I'm a haXe target!
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Pimm Hogeling
One small note here. The term "straight as3" is being used. The regulars here know what you mean, Tarwin, but OP must understand that compiling haXe code to ActionScript is uncommon. (Most of us compile haXe code directly to SWF files, which is what Tarwin was referring to.)

My company switched from ActionScript 3 to haXe. The differences we noticed are:
  1. haXe is a bit more readable than ActionScript 3. If and switch blocks can return values (very sexy!); there are typedefs which can be used as a shortcut for long types.
  2. haXe has generics; haXe properties are very cool. Those features, among some others, make it easier to write compile-time safe code in haXe. Writing safe code is important when working in teams rather than alone.
  3. We can compile haXe to JavaScript. We often do this to eliminate the cost of porting existing code. Additionally, it gives us compile-time errors when we do things wrong instead of runtime errors.
  4. It is a bit harder to use libraries written in ActionScript 3 in haXe-based projects. There are several ways to do this, all of them slightly more time consuming than simply copying the source into your ActionScript 3 project.

That's all we've noticed. haXe turned out to be not a magical secret weapon (which we didn't expect, by the way); it's just a nice tool and I'm glad we made the switch.

2011/8/15 Sven Dens <[hidden email]>
Also, let's not forget the superb haXe compiler that is still a sweet step up from the Adobe compilers, even if you're just targeting AS3.
Honesty obliges me to say that I haven't yet compared the bytecode that the haXe compiler generates vs AS3 compiled through Adobe with a second pass through Apparat.
But in any case a haXe-compiled SWF will be more efficient than an Adobe-compiled SWF. So if you have that advantage up-front, then why not learn how to program haXe instead of AS3 (or transition to it)? It's not a big change, it enforces better programming principles, ánd it offers you more deployment options.

What asset loading is concerned (or any other aspect of maintainability in a large-scale software project): this and any other relevant aspects can be tackled in any programming language as you probably know. Whether it be AS3, haXe, C#, Java, C++ or even plain old simple C. It all comes down to how you set up things, your knowledge and familiarity with the tools you're working with.

If your doubt is really only between haXe and AS3, then doubt not! Go with haXe for the reasons others & I mentioned, and sell it to your bosses with the promise of wider deployments and more efficient bytecode! You may feel "little" as a dev sometimes in a larger company, and think that you don't have much of a say in how your company wants to do things... But never forget: YOU are the dev. It is YOUR task to get a job done in a certain amount of time, and to do it in the best possible way. The people you have to account to generally don't know sh*t about the technology you use to get that job done as efficiently as possible, and it's not their job to know that neither. So step up for yourself, even if you're "just" a dev. Throw in some mojo, tell 'em this is how things are going to be done and why, deliver, and let the PM's get their share of the cake And everyone will be happy, including you :-)

/* END OF HAXE EVANGELISM TRANSMISSION */   ;-)

Sven


On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 9:34 PM, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:
On the issue of asset version control, I've found the new development work on SVN to be pretty streamlined for this; the nmml format is a nice way to keep your asset definitions separate, and it can be edited by a buildscript on the fly.  Actual runtime dynamic assets is indeed another issue though.

Where is your company located?

Best,

Alex Liebert
Milkman Games, LLC
twitter: @milkmangames

On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 8:39 AM, Tarwin Stroh-Spijer <[hidden email]> wrote:
Yeah, it really is the run-time loading of objects that will concern you with a large project as stated above. If you're ONLY targeting AS3 then nothing is different between using haxe and straight as3 anyway, as you'll like just use the as3 methods and use them in the same way as you would there.

If you've got a large budget like this and you're interested in other targets ie CPP (iPhone etc) then I'd suggest investing in creating some libraries that play well with asset loading on the fly with both targets, and maybe even look at getting a haxe expert on board to help you out as well in the early stages to scope these kinds of things.

Really though, shouldn't be any different than a good as3 project, haxe will just help you out a little, let you have more control and hopefully code more cleanly which should help.


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: <a href="tel:%2B61%203%208060%205321" value="+61380605321" target="_blank">+61 3 8060 5321
_______________________



On Sat, Aug 13, 2011 at 1:29 PM, Kevin Koechley <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Rob!

Thanks for the link, and the info.  This is EXACTLY what i was looking for!  The only examples i could find were whack-a-mole type things, which doesn't really sell the technology to those that haven't ever heard of it and are nervous about making the switch.

Your game is AWESOME!  This should really help put people's minds here at ease.

As for numbers and things, that remains to be seen, but we just got 5 million dollars in funding to build a game company and we haven't written a line of code yet.  I really think that your game ( with big brands as well as cool gameplay) will help sell the execs on the potential of haXe.

I'm looking forward to working more with this technology, and am excited about the community growing ( at least by one here).  :)

cheers,

Kevin

On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:52 PM, Rob Fell wrote:

> Welcome Kevin, we're happy you're here!
>
> With regards to your question, may I ask how you define "bigger more complex games"?  E.g. large codebase, large team size, large budget, large audience, large timeline, large filesize ;-) etc.  Can you give numbers?
>
> Imo, the challenge for team / agile scale projects remains clear separation of concerns and, for SWF target especially, the ability to runtime load what each dev / designer / team is working on into the current iteration (considering each may have independent backlogs & toolsets etc).  For myself and team, we have found haXe to be >= AS3 in most scenarios (first impression & recruitment keyword volume being the exceptions).
>
> If you have specific questions on workflow please do ask and I'm sure you'll receive a good range of high grade suggestions from members of this list.
>
> Best regards, Rob
>
> PS. I'm not sure if it qualifies as big or complex but one of the recent haXe games deployed was: http://starwars.lego.com/en-us/games/aceassault/default.aspx
>
>
>
> On 11:59 AM, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust games in haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>
>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
alx
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

alx
Offtopic.

"5 million dollars in funding to build a game company and we haven't written a line of code yet"

How I'd love to live in the USA.

On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 7:26 PM, Pimm Hogeling <[hidden email]> wrote:
One small note here. The term "straight as3" is being used. The regulars here know what you mean, Tarwin, but OP must understand that compiling haXe code to ActionScript is uncommon. (Most of us compile haXe code directly to SWF files, which is what Tarwin was referring to.)

My company switched from ActionScript 3 to haXe. The differences we noticed are:
  1. haXe is a bit more readable than ActionScript 3. If and switch blocks can return values (very sexy!); there are typedefs which can be used as a shortcut for long types.
  2. haXe has generics; haXe properties are very cool. Those features, among some others, make it easier to write compile-time safe code in haXe. Writing safe code is important when working in teams rather than alone.
  3. We can compile haXe to JavaScript. We often do this to eliminate the cost of porting existing code. Additionally, it gives us compile-time errors when we do things wrong instead of runtime errors.
  4. It is a bit harder to use libraries written in ActionScript 3 in haXe-based projects. There are several ways to do this, all of them slightly more time consuming than simply copying the source into your ActionScript 3 project.

That's all we've noticed. haXe turned out to be not a magical secret weapon (which we didn't expect, by the way); it's just a nice tool and I'm glad we made the switch.

2011/8/15 Sven Dens <[hidden email]>
Also, let's not forget the superb haXe compiler that is still a sweet step up from the Adobe compilers, even if you're just targeting AS3.
Honesty obliges me to say that I haven't yet compared the bytecode that the haXe compiler generates vs AS3 compiled through Adobe with a second pass through Apparat.
But in any case a haXe-compiled SWF will be more efficient than an Adobe-compiled SWF. So if you have that advantage up-front, then why not learn how to program haXe instead of AS3 (or transition to it)? It's not a big change, it enforces better programming principles, ánd it offers you more deployment options.

What asset loading is concerned (or any other aspect of maintainability in a large-scale software project): this and any other relevant aspects can be tackled in any programming language as you probably know. Whether it be AS3, haXe, C#, Java, C++ or even plain old simple C. It all comes down to how you set up things, your knowledge and familiarity with the tools you're working with.

If your doubt is really only between haXe and AS3, then doubt not! Go with haXe for the reasons others & I mentioned, and sell it to your bosses with the promise of wider deployments and more efficient bytecode! You may feel "little" as a dev sometimes in a larger company, and think that you don't have much of a say in how your company wants to do things... But never forget: YOU are the dev. It is YOUR task to get a job done in a certain amount of time, and to do it in the best possible way. The people you have to account to generally don't know sh*t about the technology you use to get that job done as efficiently as possible, and it's not their job to know that neither. So step up for yourself, even if you're "just" a dev. Throw in some mojo, tell 'em this is how things are going to be done and why, deliver, and let the PM's get their share of the cake And everyone will be happy, including you :-)

/* END OF HAXE EVANGELISM TRANSMISSION */   ;-)

Sven


On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 9:34 PM, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:
On the issue of asset version control, I've found the new development work on SVN to be pretty streamlined for this; the nmml format is a nice way to keep your asset definitions separate, and it can be edited by a buildscript on the fly.  Actual runtime dynamic assets is indeed another issue though.

Where is your company located?

Best,

Alex Liebert
Milkman Games, LLC
twitter: @milkmangames

On Sun, Aug 14, 2011 at 8:39 AM, Tarwin Stroh-Spijer <[hidden email]> wrote:
Yeah, it really is the run-time loading of objects that will concern you with a large project as stated above. If you're ONLY targeting AS3 then nothing is different between using haxe and straight as3 anyway, as you'll like just use the as3 methods and use them in the same way as you would there.

If you've got a large budget like this and you're interested in other targets ie CPP (iPhone etc) then I'd suggest investing in creating some libraries that play well with asset loading on the fly with both targets, and maybe even look at getting a haxe expert on board to help you out as well in the early stages to scope these kinds of things.

Really though, shouldn't be any different than a good as3 project, haxe will just help you out a little, let you have more control and hopefully code more cleanly which should help.


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

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http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: <a href="tel:%2B61%203%208060%205321" value="+61380605321" target="_blank">+61 3 8060 5321
_______________________



On Sat, Aug 13, 2011 at 1:29 PM, Kevin Koechley <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Rob!

Thanks for the link, and the info.  This is EXACTLY what i was looking for!  The only examples i could find were whack-a-mole type things, which doesn't really sell the technology to those that haven't ever heard of it and are nervous about making the switch.

Your game is AWESOME!  This should really help put people's minds here at ease.

As for numbers and things, that remains to be seen, but we just got 5 million dollars in funding to build a game company and we haven't written a line of code yet.  I really think that your game ( with big brands as well as cool gameplay) will help sell the execs on the potential of haXe.

I'm looking forward to working more with this technology, and am excited about the community growing ( at least by one here).  :)

cheers,

Kevin

On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:52 PM, Rob Fell wrote:

> Welcome Kevin, we're happy you're here!
>
> With regards to your question, may I ask how you define "bigger more complex games"?  E.g. large codebase, large team size, large budget, large audience, large timeline, large filesize ;-) etc.  Can you give numbers?
>
> Imo, the challenge for team / agile scale projects remains clear separation of concerns and, for SWF target especially, the ability to runtime load what each dev / designer / team is working on into the current iteration (considering each may have independent backlogs & toolsets etc).  For myself and team, we have found haXe to be >= AS3 in most scenarios (first impression & recruitment keyword volume being the exceptions).
>
> If you have specific questions on workflow please do ask and I'm sure you'll receive a good range of high grade suggestions from members of this list.
>
> Best regards, Rob
>
> PS. I'm not sure if it qualifies as big or complex but one of the recent haXe games deployed was: http://starwars.lego.com/en-us/games/aceassault/default.aspx
>
>
>
> On 11:59 AM, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large Flash games.  I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust games in haXe.   I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>
>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Michael Baczynski-2
In reply to this post by Kevin Koechley
I wrote several 'large' haXe games (in terms of complexity) without any problems, here are two examples:
-a facebook game called 'doodleball': http://apps.facebook.com/doodleball/
-a 'bubble shooter' game: http://www.tipp24games.de/spielen/bobble-shooter

best,
michael

On 13.08.2011 02:59, Kevin Koechley wrote:

> Hi,
>
> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>
> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large
> Flash games. I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust
> games in haXe. I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>
> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know
> of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>
> thoughts?
>
> thanks!
>
> Kevin
>
>


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
I'm guesssing by large they mean 'farmville large'- so very asset heavy.

On Monday, August 15, 2011, Michael Baczynski <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I wrote several 'large' haXe games (in terms of complexity) without any problems, here are two examples:
> -a facebook game called 'doodleball': http://apps.facebook.com/doodleball/
> -a 'bubble shooter' game: http://www.tipp24games.de/spielen/bobble-shooter
>
> best,
> michael
>
> On 13.08.2011 02:59, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large
>> Flash games. I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust
>> games in haXe. I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know
>> of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>

>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>

--


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: +61 3 8060 5321
_______________________

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: large haXe game projects with flash target

Pimm Hogeling
This game is relatively asset heavy. Not very complex, though. (Simply click the - grey - "inloggen" button and then "speel".)

2011/8/15 Tarwin Stroh-Spijer <[hidden email]>
I'm guesssing by large they mean 'farmville large'- so very asset heavy.


On Monday, August 15, 2011, Michael Baczynski <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I wrote several 'large' haXe games (in terms of complexity) without any problems, here are two examples:
> -a facebook game called 'doodleball': http://apps.facebook.com/doodleball/
> -a 'bubble shooter' game: http://www.tipp24games.de/spielen/bobble-shooter
>
> best,
> michael
>
> On 13.08.2011 02:59, Kevin Koechley wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is my first post to the haxe mailing list, and i'm happy to be here!
>>
>> I work for a game company, and we are currently trying to decide if we should use haXe for large
>> Flash games. I'm dying to see if there are any other game companies that are building large, robust
>> games in haXe. I would especially love to hear opinions on game development with large teams.
>>
>> I've already seen the showcase on the website ( http://haxe.org/com/showcase), but does anybody know
>> of anybody building bigger more complex games in haXe?
>>

>> thoughts?
>>
>> thanks!
>>
>> Kevin
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>

--


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: <a href="tel:%2B61%203%208060%205321" value="+61380605321" target="_blank">+61 3 8060 5321
_______________________

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org