What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

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What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

singmajesty

Hey guys,

I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and NME, for those  
who aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think. If I have  
expressed something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out  
something incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested to hear  
your feedback!


============


You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are both very cool.

Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript languages like  
Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can actually take your code  
and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe can become  
Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably seems a little  
confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the context of NME, a  
framework I have personally used to produce games for webOS and Facebook.

NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like API," so if you  
are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most of them are  
implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API (or do not care  
to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of sense when you  
start writing games.

NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android, Windows, Mac,  
Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that compiles as  
native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for mobile targets like  
webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows, Mac and Linux.  
Your code can also compile for the web, running your same game or  
application in Flash.

There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the Flash API to HTML5  
canvas, so theoretically your same application could also publish to  
canvas. This is something I have not played with as extensively, as Flash  
performs faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its out  
there and people use it!


=============

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Alex Liebert
it's a good overview for people who are already technical.  what's the target audience?  where would it be printed?

Alex


On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hey guys,

I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and NME, for those who aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think. If I have expressed something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out something incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested to hear your feedback!


============


You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are both very cool.

Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript languages like Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can actually take your code and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe can become Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably seems a little confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the context of NME, a framework I have personally used to produce games for webOS and Facebook.

NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like API," so if you are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most of them are implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API (or do not care to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of sense when you start writing games.

NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android, Windows, Mac, Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that compiles as native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for mobile targets like webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows, Mac and Linux. Your code can also compile for the web, running your same game or application in Flash.

There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the Flash API to HTML5 canvas, so theoretically your same application could also publish to canvas. This is something I have not played with as extensively, as Flash performs faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its out there and people use it!


=============

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

singmajesty
It's for developers.

I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be cool to  
hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it differently, etc. The  
thing you learn about working with Haxe and NME, is that whenever you  
discuss it with someone else, they are always asking the "what is it?"  
question, so it makes sense to have a good, clear answer :)



On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert  
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> it's a good overview for people who are already technical.  what's the
> target audience?  where would it be printed?
>
> Alex
>
>
> On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
> <[hidden email]>wrote:
>
>>
>> Hey guys,
>>
>> I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and NME, for those  
>> who
>> aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think. If I have  
>> expressed
>> something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out something
>> incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested to hear your
>> feedback!
>>
>>
>> ============
>>
>>
>> You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are both very cool.
>>
>> Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript languages  
>> like
>> Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can actually take your  
>> code
>> and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe can become
>> Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably seems a little
>> confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the context of NME, a
>> framework I have personally used to produce games for webOS and  
>> Facebook.
>>
>> NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like API," so if you
>> are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most of them are
>> implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API (or do not  
>> care
>> to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of sense when you
>> start writing games.
>>
>> NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android, Windows, Mac,
>> Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that compiles as
>> native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for mobile targets like
>> webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows, Mac and Linux.  
>> Your
>> code can also compile for the web, running your same game or  
>> application in
>> Flash.
>>
>> There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the Flash API to HTML5
>> canvas, so theoretically your same application could also publish to  
>> canvas.
>> This is something I have not played with as extensively, as Flash  
>> performs
>> faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its out there and
>> people use it!
>>
>>
>> =============
>>
>> --
>> haXe - an open source web programming language
>> http://haxe.org
>>


--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Alex Liebert
I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  Something like:

- NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more, from one code base.
-NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
-if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less than an hour

Alex

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:
It's for developers.

I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to have a good, clear answer :)




On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert <[hidden email]> wrote:

it's a good overview for people who are already technical.  what's the
target audience?  where would it be printed?

Alex


On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
<[hidden email]>wrote:


Hey guys,

I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and NME, for those who
aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think. If I have expressed
something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out something
incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested to hear your
feedback!


============


You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are both very cool.

Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript languages like
Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can actually take your code
and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe can become
Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably seems a little
confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the context of NME, a
framework I have personally used to produce games for webOS and Facebook.

NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like API," so if you
are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most of them are
implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API (or do not care
to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of sense when you
start writing games.

NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android, Windows, Mac,
Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that compiles as
native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for mobile targets like
webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows, Mac and Linux. Your
code can also compile for the web, running your same game or application in
Flash.

There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the Flash API to HTML5
canvas, so theoretically your same application could also publish to canvas.
This is something I have not played with as extensively, as Flash performs
faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its out there and
people use it!


=============

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org



--
Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Rob Fell
Elephant in the room:

- AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code
base.
- AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a
variety of platforms quickly
- if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running
with AIR in less than an hour

Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?

Best regards, Devil's Advocate



On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:

> I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to
> solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.
>  Something like:
>
> - NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more,
> from one code base.
> -NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for
> a variety of platforms quickly
> -if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less
> than an hour
>
> Alex
>
> On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick
> <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     It's for developers.
>
>     I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
>     cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
>     differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
>     NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
>     always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
>     have a good, clear answer :)
>
>
>
>
>     On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
>     <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>         it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
>          what's the
>         target audience?  where would it be printed?
>
>         Alex
>
>
>         On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
>         <[hidden email]
>         <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:
>
>
>             Hey guys,
>
>             I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
>             NME, for those who
>             aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
>             If I have expressed
>             something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
>             something
>             incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
>             to hear your
>             feedback!
>
>
>             ============
>
>
>             You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
>             both very cool.
>
>             Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
>             languages like
>             Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
>             actually take your code
>             and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
>             can become
>             Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
>             seems a little
>             confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
>             context of NME, a
>             framework I have personally used to produce games for
>             webOS and Facebook.
>
>             NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
>             API," so if you
>             are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
>             of them are
>             implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
>             (or do not care
>             to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
>             sense when you
>             start writing games.
>
>             NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
>             Windows, Mac,
>             Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
>             compiles as
>             native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
>             mobile targets like
>             webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
>             Mac and Linux. Your
>             code can also compile for the web, running your same game
>             or application in
>             Flash.
>
>             There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
>             Flash API to HTML5
>             canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
>             publish to canvas.
>             This is something I have not played with as extensively,
>             as Flash performs
>             faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
>             out there and
>             people use it!
>
>
>             =============
>
>             --
>             haXe - an open source web programming language
>             http://haxe.org
>
>
>
>     --
>     Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
>
>
>     --
>     haXe - an open source web programming language
>     http://haxe.org
>
>


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Alex Liebert
Good points Rob.  I can answer why I chose it over AIR for my current project (but not others, each has their place i think, and can work together), and maybe we can parlay that into something useful to a broader discussion:

-nme performs much faster, especially when you're trying to do an arcade game or something that depends on fast animation
-nme has less overhead and filesize bloat
-nme is more flexible with installation options and has no separate runtime or mandatory runtime license agreement to show users at install
-The current release version of AIR requires Android users to go back to the market and download a separate AIR runtime, a huge friction point
-nme allows you to write platform-specific code where you need to to get platform specific features (like iOS leaderboards for instance)
-NME / haxe supports a wider variety of platforms
-NME/ haxe produces natives apps that can play by the rules of important publishers (an AIR desktop game will not be accepted by ANY of the major casual download game portals, an AIR desktop app will not be accepted to the Mac App store, an air android app won't be accepted by a number of '3rd party' android app stores...)
-nme can target more platforms well (webos, html5...)
-if it turns out nme's not right for you, you can generate an air app from your haxe code anyway

some of these things are changing/are likely to change as air improves.  i know haxe/nme will be improving right along with it though.

Alex

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 3:42 PM, Rob Fell <[hidden email]> wrote:
Elephant in the room:

- AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code base.
- AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
- if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running with AIR in less than an hour

Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?

Best regards, Devil's Advocate




On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:
I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  Something like:

- NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more, from one code base.
-NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
-if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less than an hour

Alex

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

   It's for developers.

   I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
   cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
   differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
   NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
   always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
   have a good, clear answer :)




   On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
   <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

       it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
        what's the
       target audience?  where would it be printed?

       Alex


       On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
       <[hidden email]
       <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:



           Hey guys,

           I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
           NME, for those who
           aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
           If I have expressed
           something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
           something
           incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
           to hear your
           feedback!


           ============


           You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
           both very cool.

           Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
           languages like
           Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
           actually take your code
           and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
           can become
           Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
           seems a little
           confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
           context of NME, a
           framework I have personally used to produce games for
           webOS and Facebook.

           NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
           API," so if you
           are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
           of them are
           implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
           (or do not care
           to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
           sense when you
           start writing games.

           NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
           Windows, Mac,
           Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
           compiles as
           native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
           mobile targets like
           webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
           Mac and Linux. Your
           code can also compile for the web, running your same game
           or application in
           Flash.

           There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
           Flash API to HTML5
           canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
           publish to canvas.
           This is something I have not played with as extensively,
           as Flash performs
           faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
           out there and
           people use it!


           =============

           --
           haXe - an open source web programming language
           http://haxe.org



   --     Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/


   --     haXe - an open source web programming language
   http://haxe.org




--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
alx
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Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

alx
In reply to this post by Rob Fell
On some use cases, that you eventually get used to exploit, the performance difference between an AIR "reinterpreted" application and hxcpp-nme is huge! (being hxcpp better).

You can always go haxe->swf and then package with AIR if you still prefer to.

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 5:42 PM, Rob Fell <[hidden email]> wrote:
Elephant in the room:

- AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code base.
- AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
- if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running with AIR in less than an hour

Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?

Best regards, Devil's Advocate



On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:
I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  Something like:

- NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more, from one code base.
-NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
-if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less than an hour

Alex

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

   It's for developers.

   I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
   cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
   differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
   NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
   always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
   have a good, clear answer :)




   On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
   <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

       it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
        what's the
       target audience?  where would it be printed?

       Alex


       On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
       <[hidden email]
       <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:


           Hey guys,

           I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
           NME, for those who
           aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
           If I have expressed
           something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
           something
           incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
           to hear your
           feedback!


           ============


           You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
           both very cool.

           Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
           languages like
           Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
           actually take your code
           and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
           can become
           Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
           seems a little
           confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
           context of NME, a
           framework I have personally used to produce games for
           webOS and Facebook.

           NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
           API," so if you
           are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
           of them are
           implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
           (or do not care
           to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
           sense when you
           start writing games.

           NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
           Windows, Mac,
           Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
           compiles as
           native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
           mobile targets like
           webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
           Mac and Linux. Your
           code can also compile for the web, running your same game
           or application in
           Flash.

           There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
           Flash API to HTML5
           canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
           publish to canvas.
           This is something I have not played with as extensively,
           as Flash performs
           faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
           out there and
           people use it!


           =============

           --
           haXe - an open source web programming language
           http://haxe.org



   --     Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/


   --     haXe - an open source web programming language
   http://haxe.org




--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

singmajesty
In reply to this post by Rob Fell
Hey DA :)


  - No Adobe installer required. Just your app

  - Get native performance, up to 3X faster than AIR in some benchmarks

  - Get native features. You aren't limited by the native APIs Adobe  
chooses to implement

  - Free open-source. The keys are in your hands, not another company

  - More platforms. HTML5, webOS, Nook, DS, PSP ...?

  - More exposure. Mobile app stores, Steam, Mac App Store, Amazon App  
Store, Chrome App Store, etc.

  - Smart install tool. Build, package, install, run and log applications  
with a single command







On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 15:42:19 -0700, Rob Fell <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Elephant in the room:
>
> - AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code  
> base.
> - AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a  
> variety of platforms quickly
> - if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running  
> with AIR in less than an hour
>
> Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?
>
> Best regards, Devil's Advocate
>
>
>
> On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:
>> I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to  
>> solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  
>>  Something like:
>>
>> - NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more,  
>> from one code base.
>> -NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for  
>> a variety of platforms quickly
>> -if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less  
>> than an hour
>>
>> Alex
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick  
>> <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>     It's for developers.
>>
>>     I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
>>     cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
>>     differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
>>     NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
>>     always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
>>     have a good, clear answer :)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>     On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
>>     <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>>  
>> wrote:
>>
>>         it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
>>          what's the
>>         target audience?  where would it be printed?
>>
>>         Alex
>>
>>
>>         On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
>>         <[hidden email]
>>         <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>             Hey guys,
>>
>>             I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
>>             NME, for those who
>>             aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
>>             If I have expressed
>>             something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
>>             something
>>             incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
>>             to hear your
>>             feedback!
>>
>>
>>             ============
>>
>>
>>             You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
>>             both very cool.
>>
>>             Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
>>             languages like
>>             Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
>>             actually take your code
>>             and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
>>             can become
>>             Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
>>             seems a little
>>             confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
>>             context of NME, a
>>             framework I have personally used to produce games for
>>             webOS and Facebook.
>>
>>             NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
>>             API," so if you
>>             are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
>>             of them are
>>             implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
>>             (or do not care
>>             to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
>>             sense when you
>>             start writing games.
>>
>>             NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
>>             Windows, Mac,
>>             Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
>>             compiles as
>>             native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
>>             mobile targets like
>>             webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
>>             Mac and Linux. Your
>>             code can also compile for the web, running your same game
>>             or application in
>>             Flash.
>>
>>             There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
>>             Flash API to HTML5
>>             canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
>>             publish to canvas.
>>             This is something I have not played with as extensively,
>>             as Flash performs
>>             faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
>>             out there and
>>             people use it!
>>
>>
>>             =============
>>
>>             --
>>             haXe - an open source web programming language
>>             http://haxe.org
>>
>>
>>
>>     --     Using Opera's revolutionary email client:  
>> http://www.opera.com/mail/
>>
>>
>>     --     haXe - an open source web programming language
>>     http://haxe.org
>>
>>
>

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Elsass Philippe
In reply to this post by singmajesty
Joshua,
I think your writing is good for a forum or a blog, but not as an
introduction to NME: it's a bit too convoluted and personal.

A formal presentation should be a few incisive bullet points:
NME is the product, it produces native, fast, slim, applications for
plenty of platforms, it's written in haxe (a mature, rich, etc. lang).

Then NME needs a showcase - without apps you're nothing. People will
judge NME by the cool stuff you make with it (think Corona and its
complete & great sample games - unlike OpenPlug and its handful of
boring apps it presents). And by cool I mean it shouldn't even show
ugly/lame NME apps.

About AIR:
- I don't think it's worth mentioning AIR at all in NME presentation
(keep it for a FAQ or an article), being "3x faster in some
benchmarks" it's a weak/childish pretention and people are
aware/quickly discover about AIR limitations (not native, kind of
bloated, limited to iOS/Android),
- don't underestimate AIR and consider it may have soon offer: more
performance, fully standalone apps and extensibility using native
code,
- AIR is hard to optimize for mobile devices: NME should run great on
mobile devices (this means a good game framework and simple rules is
important - think flixel/cocos2D/libgdx).
- AIR doesn't have in-app payment & ads for mobile: NME should offer those.

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Alan Shaw-4
In reply to this post by singmajesty
Who's the target audience? Me! I'm learning from the description and
the discussion.

On 7/29/11, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:

> It's for developers.
>
> I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be cool to
> hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it differently, etc. The
> thing you learn about working with Haxe and NME, is that whenever you
> discuss it with someone else, they are always asking the "what is it?"
> question, so it makes sense to have a good, clear answer :)
>
>
>
> On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> it's a good overview for people who are already technical.  what's the
>> target audience?  where would it be printed?
>>
>> Alex
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
>> <[hidden email]>wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> Hey guys,
>>>
>>> I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and NME, for those
>>> who
>>> aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think. If I have
>>> expressed
>>> something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out something
>>> incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested to hear your
>>> feedback!
>>>
>>>
>>> ============
>>>
>>>
>>> You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are both very cool.
>>>
>>> Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript languages
>>> like
>>> Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can actually take your
>>> code
>>> and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe can become
>>> Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably seems a little
>>> confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the context of NME, a
>>> framework I have personally used to produce games for webOS and
>>> Facebook.
>>>
>>> NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like API," so if you
>>> are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most of them are
>>> implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API (or do not
>>> care
>>> to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of sense when you
>>> start writing games.
>>>
>>> NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android, Windows, Mac,
>>> Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that compiles as
>>> native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for mobile targets like
>>> webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows, Mac and Linux.
>>> Your
>>> code can also compile for the web, running your same game or
>>> application in
>>> Flash.
>>>
>>> There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the Flash API to HTML5
>>> canvas, so theoretically your same application could also publish to
>>> canvas.
>>> This is something I have not played with as extensively, as Flash
>>> performs
>>> faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its out there and
>>> people use it!
>>>
>>>
>>> =============
>>>
>>> --
>>> haXe - an open source web programming language
>>> http://haxe.org
>>>
>
>
> --
> Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Rob Fell
In reply to this post by alx

Thanks for your replies guys, some good (and new!) points - great to see them in one place.

Is there any information on what kind of third party libs NME can consume?  imo this is more important for performance gains than sprite benchmarks (because usually the fastest code to an unknown problem has already been written by someone else).

I do give kudos to AIR in this regard: a plethora of SWF, SWC, AS3, haXe or even
CPP libs to choose from.  Perhaps too many?


On 11:59 AM, alx wrote:
On some use cases, that you eventually get used to exploit, the performance difference between an AIR "reinterpreted" application and hxcpp-nme is huge! (being hxcpp better).

You can always go haxe->swf and then package with AIR if you still prefer to.

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 5:42 PM, Rob Fell <[hidden email]> wrote:
Elephant in the room:

- AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code base.
- AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
- if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running with AIR in less than an hour

Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?

Best regards, Devil's Advocate



On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:
I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  Something like:

- NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more, from one code base.
-NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
-if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less than an hour

Alex

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

   It's for developers.

   I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
   cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
   differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
   NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
   always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
   have a good, clear answer :)




   On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
   <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

       it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
        what's the
       target audience?  where would it be printed?

       Alex


       On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
       <[hidden email]
       <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:


           Hey guys,

           I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
           NME, for those who
           aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
           If I have expressed
           something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
           something
           incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
           to hear your
           feedback!


           ============


           You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
           both very cool.

           Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
           languages like
           Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
           actually take your code
           and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
           can become
           Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
           seems a little
           confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
           context of NME, a
           framework I have personally used to produce games for
           webOS and Facebook.

           NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
           API," so if you
           are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
           of them are
           implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
           (or do not care
           to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
           sense when you
           start writing games.

           NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
           Windows, Mac,
           Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
           compiles as
           native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
           mobile targets like
           webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
           Mac and Linux. Your
           code can also compile for the web, running your same game
           or application in
           Flash.

           There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
           Flash API to HTML5
           canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
           publish to canvas.
           This is something I have not played with as extensively,
           as Flash performs
           faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
           out there and
           people use it!


           =============

           --
           haXe - an open source web programming language
           http://haxe.org



   --     Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/


   --     haXe - an open source web programming language
   http://haxe.org




--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org



--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Pimm Hogeling
"The Haxe compiler can actually take your code and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe can become Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP."

While entirely true, not many haXe developers use the ActionScript target.

You see, there's a widespread misunderstanding that compiling haXe code to ActionScript 3 and then compiling that to a SWF is the normal workflow for haXe developers creating Flash content. It's not. Some people think that's is how the haXe compiler works under the hood. It doesn't.

Most haXe developers creating Flash content compile their haXe code straight to SWF files. There is no ActionScript 3 involved whatsoever.

Think of it this way. You can cross a shallow river using a punt. Flash Player is the river. ActionScript 3 is the punt. If you decide to use haXe instead, you're crossing the river using a small sailboat. haXe is not a sailboat that requires punting. It is a regular sailboat, it uses the wind.

If you really want to, you could start punting in the sailboat as well. You can compile your haXe code to ActionScript 3. It's just not very common.

2011/8/1 Rob Fell <[hidden email]>

Thanks for your replies guys, some good (and new!) points - great to see them in one place.

Is there any information on what kind of third party libs NME can consume?  imo this is more important for performance gains than sprite benchmarks (because usually the fastest code to an unknown problem has already been written by someone else).

I do give kudos to AIR in this regard: a plethora of SWF, SWC, AS3, haXe or even
CPP libs to choose from.  Perhaps too many?


On 11:59 AM, alx wrote:
On some use cases, that you eventually get used to exploit, the performance difference between an AIR "reinterpreted" application and hxcpp-nme is huge! (being hxcpp better).

You can always go haxe->swf and then package with AIR if you still prefer to.

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 5:42 PM, Rob Fell <[hidden email]> wrote:
Elephant in the room:

- AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code base.
- AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
- if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running with AIR in less than an hour

Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?

Best regards, Devil's Advocate



On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:
I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  Something like:

- NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more, from one code base.
-NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for a variety of platforms quickly
-if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less than an hour

Alex

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

   It's for developers.

   I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
   cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
   differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
   NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
   always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
   have a good, clear answer :)




   On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
   <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

       it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
        what's the
       target audience?  where would it be printed?

       Alex


       On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
       <[hidden email]
       <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:


           Hey guys,

           I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
           NME, for those who
           aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
           If I have expressed
           something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
           something
           incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
           to hear your
           feedback!


           ============


           You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
           both very cool.

           Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
           languages like
           Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
           actually take your code
           and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
           can become
           Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
           seems a little
           confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
           context of NME, a
           framework I have personally used to produce games for
           webOS and Facebook.

           NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
           API," so if you
           are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
           of them are
           implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
           (or do not care
           to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
           sense when you
           start writing games.

           NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
           Windows, Mac,
           Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
           compiles as
           native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
           mobile targets like
           webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
           Mac and Linux. Your
           code can also compile for the web, running your same game
           or application in
           Flash.

           There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
           Flash API to HTML5
           canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
           publish to canvas.
           This is something I have not played with as extensively,
           as Flash performs
           faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
           out there and
           people use it!


           =============

           --
           haXe - an open source web programming language
           http://haxe.org



   --     Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/


   --     haXe - an open source web programming language
   http://haxe.org




--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org



--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

singmajesty
That's true. Flash and Neko would both be exceptions where the Haxe  
compiler is going straight to the final runtime, rather than generating  
source files for another compiler to consume.

Actually, PHP and Javascript are not compiled languages, so really C++ is  
the exception here. It's nice, however, that there is an install tool, so  
even though you have more dependencies for C++, the process is still  
code->executable, without having to bother in-between.




On Tue, 02 Aug 2011 01:20:46 -0700, Pimm Hogeling <[hidden email]>  
wrote:

> "*The Haxe compiler can actually take your code and turn it *into* other
> languages. Code written in Haxe can become Javascript, Actionscript, C++  
> and
> even PHP.*"
>
> While entirely true, *not many haXe developers use the ActionScript  
> target*.
>
> You see, there's a
> widespread<http://www.quora.com/Im-looking-at-haXe-for-developing-a-flash-based-game-I-hear-it-has-better-performance-than-vanilla-AS3-Is-it-still-a-work-in-progress>misunderstanding
> that compiling haXe code to ActionScript 3 and then
> compiling that to a SWF is the normal workflow for haXe developers  
> creating
> Flash content. It's not. Some people think that's is how the haXe  
> compiler
> works under the hood. It doesn't.
>
> Most haXe developers creating Flash content compile their *haXe code
> straight to SWF files*. There is no ActionScript 3 involved whatsoever.
>
> Think of it this way. You can cross a shallow river using a
> punt<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punt_%28boat%29>.
> Flash Player is the river. ActionScript 3 is the punt. If you decide to  
> use
> haXe instead, you're crossing the river using a small sailboat. haXe is  
> not
> a sailboat that requires punting. It is a regular sailboat, it uses the
> wind.
>
> If you really want to, you could start punting in the sailboat as well.  
> You
> can compile your haXe code to ActionScript 3. It's just not very common.
>
> 2011/8/1 Rob Fell <[hidden email]>
>
>> **
>>
>> Thanks for your replies guys, some good (and new!) points - great to see
>> them in one place.
>>
>> Is there any information on what kind of third party libs NME can  
>> consume?
>> imo this is more important for performance gains than sprite benchmarks
>> (because usually the fastest code to an unknown problem has already been
>> written by someone else).
>>
>> I do give kudos to AIR in this regard: a plethora of SWF, SWC, AS3,  
>> haXe or
>> even CPP libs to choose from.  Perhaps too many?
>>
>>
>> On 11:59 AM, alx wrote:
>>
>> On some use cases, that you eventually get used to exploit, the  
>> performance
>> difference between an AIR "reinterpreted" application and hxcpp-nme is  
>> huge!
>> (being hxcpp better).
>>
>>  You can always go haxe->swf and then package with AIR if you still  
>> prefer
>> to.
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 5:42 PM, Rob Fell <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Elephant in the room:
>>>
>>> - AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code
>>> base.
>>> - AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a
>>> variety of platforms quickly
>>> - if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running  
>>> with
>>> AIR in less than an hour
>>>
>>> Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?
>>>
>>> Best regards, Devil's Advocate
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:
>>>
>>>> I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to
>>>> solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  
>>>> Something
>>>> like:
>>>>
>>>> - NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more,  
>>>> from
>>>> one code base.
>>>> -NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games  
>>>> for a
>>>> variety of platforms quickly
>>>> -if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less  
>>>> than
>>>> an hour
>>>>
>>>> Alex
>>>>
>>>> On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick <
>>>> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>    It's for developers.
>>>>
>>>>    I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
>>>>    cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
>>>>    differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
>>>>    NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
>>>>    always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
>>>>    have a good, clear answer :)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>    On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
>>>>    <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>>  
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>        it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
>>>>         what's the
>>>>        target audience?  where would it be printed?
>>>>
>>>>        Alex
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>        On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
>>>>        <[hidden email]
>>>>        <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>            Hey guys,
>>>>
>>>>            I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
>>>>            NME, for those who
>>>>            aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
>>>>            If I have expressed
>>>>            something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
>>>>            something
>>>>            incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
>>>>            to hear your
>>>>            feedback!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>            ============
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>            You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
>>>>            both very cool.
>>>>
>>>>            Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
>>>>            languages like
>>>>            Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
>>>>            actually take your code
>>>>            and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
>>>>            can become
>>>>            Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
>>>>            seems a little
>>>>            confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
>>>>            context of NME, a
>>>>            framework I have personally used to produce games for
>>>>            webOS and Facebook.
>>>>
>>>>            NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
>>>>            API," so if you
>>>>            are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
>>>>            of them are
>>>>            implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
>>>>            (or do not care
>>>>            to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
>>>>            sense when you
>>>>            start writing games.
>>>>
>>>>            NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
>>>>            Windows, Mac,
>>>>            Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
>>>>            compiles as
>>>>            native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
>>>>            mobile targets like
>>>>            webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
>>>>            Mac and Linux. Your
>>>>            code can also compile for the web, running your same game
>>>>            or application in
>>>>            Flash.
>>>>
>>>>            There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
>>>>            Flash API to HTML5
>>>>            canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
>>>>            publish to canvas.
>>>>            This is something I have not played with as extensively,
>>>>            as Flash performs
>>>>            faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
>>>>            out there and
>>>>            people use it!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>            =============
>>>>
>>>>            --
>>>>            haXe - an open source web programming language
>>>>            http://haxe.org
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>    --     Using Opera's revolutionary email client:
>>>> http://www.opera.com/mail/
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>    --     haXe - an open source web programming language
>>>>    http://haxe.org
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> haXe - an open source web programming language
>>> http://haxe.org
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> haXe - an open source web programming language
>> http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Re: Re: [haXe] What do you think, quick overview of Haxe and NME?

Alex Liebert
One note on that topic- I think the selling point of the 'output to as3' option is a fallback for you or the higher-ups.  Something goes horribly wrong, someone nixes it- press a button and you've got as3 and you go back to the old way of donig things.

On Tue, Aug 2, 2011 at 7:04 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:
That's true. Flash and Neko would both be exceptions where the Haxe compiler is going straight to the final runtime, rather than generating source files for another compiler to consume.

Actually, PHP and Javascript are not compiled languages, so really C++ is the exception here. It's nice, however, that there is an install tool, so even though you have more dependencies for C++, the process is still code->executable, without having to bother in-between.




On Tue, 02 Aug 2011 01:20:46 -0700, Pimm Hogeling <[hidden email]> wrote:

"*The Haxe compiler can actually take your code and turn it *into* other

languages. Code written in Haxe can become Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and
even PHP.*"

While entirely true, *not many haXe developers use the ActionScript target*.

You see, there's a
widespread<http://www.quora.com/Im-looking-at-haXe-for-developing-a-flash-based-game-I-hear-it-has-better-performance-than-vanilla-AS3-Is-it-still-a-work-in-progress>misunderstanding

that compiling haXe code to ActionScript 3 and then
compiling that to a SWF is the normal workflow for haXe developers creating
Flash content. It's not. Some people think that's is how the haXe compiler
works under the hood. It doesn't.

Most haXe developers creating Flash content compile their *haXe code
straight to SWF files*. There is no ActionScript 3 involved whatsoever.

Think of it this way. You can cross a shallow river using a
punt<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punt_%28boat%29>.

Flash Player is the river. ActionScript 3 is the punt. If you decide to use
haXe instead, you're crossing the river using a small sailboat. haXe is not
a sailboat that requires punting. It is a regular sailboat, it uses the
wind.

If you really want to, you could start punting in the sailboat as well. You
can compile your haXe code to ActionScript 3. It's just not very common.

2011/8/1 Rob Fell <[hidden email]>

**

Thanks for your replies guys, some good (and new!) points - great to see
them in one place.

Is there any information on what kind of third party libs NME can consume?
imo this is more important for performance gains than sprite benchmarks
(because usually the fastest code to an unknown problem has already been
written by someone else).

I do give kudos to AIR in this regard: a plethora of SWF, SWC, AS3, haXe or
even CPP libs to choose from.  Perhaps too many?


On 11:59 AM, alx wrote:

On some use cases, that you eventually get used to exploit, the performance
difference between an AIR "reinterpreted" application and hxcpp-nme is huge!
(being hxcpp better).

 You can always go haxe->swf and then package with AIR if you still prefer
to.

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 5:42 PM, Rob Fell <[hidden email]> wrote:

Elephant in the room:

- AIR produces apps for iOS, Playbook, Android, and more, from one code
base.
- AIR lets you use the Flash APIs you already know to make games for a
variety of platforms quickly
- if you know AS3 (or the incredible haXe), you'll be up and running with
AIR in less than an hour

Why should I use NME instead of Adobe AIR?

Best regards, Devil's Advocate



On 11:59 AM, Alex Liebert wrote:

I like it.  I do think you'd need to cut it down to bullet points to
solicit a more general audience.  People don't read paragraphs.  Something
like:

- NME produces fast, native apps for iOS, WebOS, Android, and more, from
one code base.
-NME lets you use the Flash APIs you already to know to make games for a
variety of platforms quickly
-if you know AS3 or Java, you'll be up and running with haXe in less than
an hour

Alex

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Joshua Granick <
[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

  It's for developers.

  I wrote it on a forum, but after posting, I though it might be
  cool to hear what you guys thought, if you would describe it
  differently, etc. The thing you learn about working with Haxe and
  NME, is that whenever you discuss it with someone else, they are
  always asking the "what is it?" question, so it makes sense to
  have a good, clear answer :)




  On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 13:47:52 -0700, Alex Liebert
  <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

      it's a good overview for people who are already technical.
       what's the
      target audience?  where would it be printed?

      Alex


      On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:45 PM, Joshua Granick
      <[hidden email]
      <mailto:[hidden email]>>wrote:


          Hey guys,

          I just found myself writing a brief overview of Haxe and
          NME, for those who
          aren't familiar with either. I'm curious what you think.
          If I have expressed
          something wrong, majored on the wrong points, or left out
          something
          incredibly cool that I shouldn't have, I'd be interested
          to hear your
          feedback!


          ============


          You probably have not heard of Haxe or NME, but they are
          both very cool.

          Haxe is a "multi-platform language," similar to ECMAscript
          languages like
          Javascript and Actionscript. The Haxe compiler can
          actually take your code
          and turn it *into* other languages. Code written in Haxe
          can become
          Javascript, Actionscript, C++ and even PHP. This probably
          seems a little
          confusing, but it is much easier to understand in the
          context of NME, a
          framework I have personally used to produce games for
          webOS and Facebook.

          NME is a cross-platform library which uses a "Flash-like
          API," so if you
          are familiar with flash.display.Sprite and friends, most
          of them are
          implemented. Even if you are not familiar with Flash's API
          (or do not care
          to learn), trust me, it is easy-to-use and makes a lot of
          sense when you
          start writing games.

          NME currently supports "targets" like webOS, iOS, Android,
          Windows, Mac,
          Linux and Flash. You can write platform-agnostic code that
          compiles as
          native C++ (using SDL, OpenGL or OpenGL ES, etc) for
          mobile targets like
          webOS, iOS and Android, or desktop targets like Windows,
          Mac and Linux. Your
          code can also compile for the web, running your same game
          or application in
          Flash.

          There is also a project called "jeash" which maps the
          Flash API to HTML5
          canvas, so theoretically your same application could also
          publish to canvas.
          This is something I have not played with as extensively,
          as Flash performs
          faster and translates more transparently from C++, but its
          out there and
          people use it!


          =============

          --
          haXe - an open source web programming language
          http://haxe.org



  --     Using Opera's revolutionary email client:
http://www.opera.com/mail/


  --     haXe - an open source web programming language
  http://haxe.org




--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org




--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org