Uga the caveman, a short game in haxe

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Uga the caveman, a short game in haxe

Adán clemente
Hello mailing list.

I have wanted to switch from as3 to haxe for a long time, so I decided
to make a game to ease me in the syntax.
Here is my experience.

It was more frustrating than difficult. Hundreds of "Float should be
Int" and missing super()s but overall the language per se is very
similar and the few "advanced" features I used worked without much trouble.

So why was it frustrating? Mainly for the documentation, or, rather, the
lack of.
Most of the time was wasted trying to do the more mundane things, like
embedding an image, until you find in some blog that you can use
@:bitmap, so obviously you try to look for the magic word that will let
you embed a binary file. But that's a compiler directive. After 2 hours
of searching for how to embed an mp3 you install nme. And that breaks
part of your code and suddenly you don't know how to link to a swf.

As you can see it left me with mixed feelings, haxe looks like a great
tool for good programmers, but in the hands of less experienced people
the "you are on your own" feeling is quite disheartening.

And finally the game http://www.ishtories.com/Uga-the-caveman.html short
simple platformer where you compete against ghost replays of other
people. You will die, you are warned, don't cry.

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Uga the caveman, a short game in haxe

Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
Welcome to the community and thanks for the feedback. I think the main problem you're having comes from the fact that haxe is for so many things - not just visual display from library assets ala Flash, or from embedded ala Flex.

Having the new NME site, with tutorials, will help this I think.

If you're just targeting Flash it's actually exactly the same as using Flash. You make your library using the IDE then get the assets from here.

I know coming from Flex this is different as you expect the embedding to work. I think a "I'm from Flex what do I do" tutorial would be good and probably solve all these problems you had?

The Float / Int problem. Was this because you were porting code? If not, then it's something that after using haxe for a short while you'll end up not doing anymore.

PS: great solid game!


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: +61 3 8060 5321
_______________________


On Thu, Oct 27, 2011 at 9:41 AM, Adán clemente <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello mailing list.

I have wanted to switch from as3 to haxe for a long time, so I decided to make a game to ease me in the syntax.
Here is my experience.

It was more frustrating than difficult. Hundreds of "Float should be Int" and missing super()s but overall the language per se is very similar and the few "advanced" features I used worked without much trouble.

So why was it frustrating? Mainly for the documentation, or, rather, the lack of.
Most of the time was wasted trying to do the more mundane things, like embedding an image, until you find in some blog that you can use @:bitmap, so obviously you try to look for the magic word that will let you embed a binary file. But that's a compiler directive. After 2 hours of searching for how to embed an mp3 you install nme. And that breaks part of your code and suddenly you don't know how to link to a swf.

As you can see it left me with mixed feelings, haxe looks like a great tool for good programmers, but in the hands of less experienced people the "you are on your own" feeling is quite disheartening.

And finally the game http://www.ishtories.com/Uga-the-caveman.html short simple platformer where you compete against ghost replays of other people. You will die, you are warned, don't cry.

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Uga the caveman, a short game in haxe

singmajesty
Awesome, you made a fun game!

You're right -- it starts off easy, but by the sixth or seventh level, it  
starts getting a bit trickier :)

NME may be helpful -- it includes embedding for bitmaps, sounds, fonts,  
text and bytes for SWFs, which may be helpful for you. You can also use it  
to publish to Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, webOS and Android as a native C++  
application, or it is compatible with Jeash for publishing to HTML5.

If you decide to give NME a try, and feel stuck or confused, let me know.  
You can write on this forum, or I follow the forums and mailing list for  
NME more closely, nowadays. I want to continue to improve the resources  
and documentation for the framework, so feedback is helpful!

Have a great day and thanks for sharing :)



On Wed, 26 Oct 2011 15:49:08 -0700, Tarwin Stroh-Spijer  
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Welcome to the community and thanks for the feedback. I think the main
> problem you're having comes from the fact that haxe is for so many  
> things -
> not just visual display from library assets ala Flash, or from embedded  
> ala
> Flex.
>
> Having the new NME site, with tutorials, will help this I think.
>
> If you're just targeting Flash it's actually exactly the same as using
> Flash. You make your library using the IDE then get the assets from here.
>
> I know coming from Flex this is different as you expect the embedding to
> work. I think a "I'm from Flex what do I do" tutorial would be good and
> probably solve all these problems you had?
>
> The Float / Int problem. Was this because you were porting code? If not,
> then it's something that after using haxe for a short while you'll end up
> not doing anymore.
>
> PS: great solid game!
>
>
> Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
> _______________________
>
> Touch My Pixel
> http://www.touchmypixel.com/
> phone: +61 3 8060 5321
> _______________________
>
>
> On Thu, Oct 27, 2011 at 9:41 AM, Adán clemente <[hidden email]>  
> wrote:
>
>> Hello mailing list.
>>
>> I have wanted to switch from as3 to haxe for a long time, so I decided  
>> to
>> make a game to ease me in the syntax.
>> Here is my experience.
>>
>> It was more frustrating than difficult. Hundreds of "Float should be  
>> Int"
>> and missing super()s but overall the language per se is very similar  
>> and the
>> few "advanced" features I used worked without much trouble.
>>
>> So why was it frustrating? Mainly for the documentation, or, rather, the
>> lack of.
>> Most of the time was wasted trying to do the more mundane things, like
>> embedding an image, until you find in some blog that you can use  
>> @:bitmap,
>> so obviously you try to look for the magic word that will let you embed  
>> a
>> binary file. But that's a compiler directive. After 2 hours of  
>> searching for
>> how to embed an mp3 you install nme. And that breaks part of your code  
>> and
>> suddenly you don't know how to link to a swf.
>>
>> As you can see it left me with mixed feelings, haxe looks like a great  
>> tool
>> for good programmers, but in the hands of less experienced people the  
>> "you
>> are on your own" feeling is quite disheartening.
>>
>> And finally the game  
>> http://www.ishtories.com/Uga-**the-caveman.html<http://www.ishtories.com/Uga-the-caveman.html>short  
>> simple platformer where you compete against ghost replays of other
>> people. You will die, you are warned, don't cry.
>>
>> --
>> haXe - an open source web programming language
>> http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Uga the caveman, a short game in haxe

Alex Liebert
I'd reccommend NME even for targeting flash as it streamlines all the asset embedding nonesense for you.

As for floats and ints - I'd 99% guess this is when using Rectangles or Bitmaps (thats where I hit it all the time at least.)  new BitmapData() expects Int, and I often find myself having to Std.int() around it.

On Wed, Oct 26, 2011 at 5:10 PM, Joshua Granick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Awesome, you made a fun game!

You're right -- it starts off easy, but by the sixth or seventh level, it starts getting a bit trickier :)

NME may be helpful -- it includes embedding for bitmaps, sounds, fonts, text and bytes for SWFs, which may be helpful for you. You can also use it to publish to Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, webOS and Android as a native C++ application, or it is compatible with Jeash for publishing to HTML5.

If you decide to give NME a try, and feel stuck or confused, let me know. You can write on this forum, or I follow the forums and mailing list for NME more closely, nowadays. I want to continue to improve the resources and documentation for the framework, so feedback is helpful!

Have a great day and thanks for sharing :)




On Wed, 26 Oct 2011 15:49:08 -0700, Tarwin Stroh-Spijer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Welcome to the community and thanks for the feedback. I think the main
problem you're having comes from the fact that haxe is for so many things -
not just visual display from library assets ala Flash, or from embedded ala
Flex.

Having the new NME site, with tutorials, will help this I think.

If you're just targeting Flash it's actually exactly the same as using
Flash. You make your library using the IDE then get the assets from here.

I know coming from Flex this is different as you expect the embedding to
work. I think a "I'm from Flex what do I do" tutorial would be good and
probably solve all these problems you had?

The Float / Int problem. Was this because you were porting code? If not,
then it's something that after using haxe for a short while you'll end up
not doing anymore.

PS: great solid game!


Tarwin Stroh-Spijer
_______________________

Touch My Pixel
http://www.touchmypixel.com/
phone: <a href="tel:%2B61%203%208060%205321" value="+61380605321" target="_blank">+61 3 8060 5321
_______________________


On Thu, Oct 27, 2011 at 9:41 AM, Adán clemente <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hello mailing list.

I have wanted to switch from as3 to haxe for a long time, so I decided to
make a game to ease me in the syntax.
Here is my experience.

It was more frustrating than difficult. Hundreds of "Float should be Int"
and missing super()s but overall the language per se is very similar and the
few "advanced" features I used worked without much trouble.

So why was it frustrating? Mainly for the documentation, or, rather, the
lack of.
Most of the time was wasted trying to do the more mundane things, like
embedding an image, until you find in some blog that you can use @:bitmap,
so obviously you try to look for the magic word that will let you embed a
binary file. But that's a compiler directive. After 2 hours of searching for
how to embed an mp3 you install nme. And that breaks part of your code and
suddenly you don't know how to link to a swf.

As you can see it left me with mixed feelings, haxe looks like a great tool
for good programmers, but in the hands of less experienced people the "you
are on your own" feeling is quite disheartening.

And finally the game http://www.ishtories.com/Uga-**the-caveman.html<http://www.ishtories.com/Uga-the-caveman.html>short simple platformer where you compete against ghost replays of other

people. You will die, you are warned, don't cry.

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org