Exploring haXe, again.

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Exploring haXe, again.

Marcelo de Moraes Serpa
Hey guys,

I've been away from Flash and haXe for almost 4 years. In fact, I never really used haXe for more than a few toy projects for learning purposes. However, I always felt that haXe was the next big thing and that I should have been using it to create cool stuff.

Happened that time passed by and I started using ruby and rails. I love ruby, and nowadays I'm a software engineer mainly using ruby (and its web frameworks) in my day-job.

The other day, I was searching the web and found the new project by Blitz Research, called Monkey: [http://www.monkeycoder.co.nz/] -  It's seems to be pretty cool, and is basically follows the same ideas haXe does. It might also bring you guys some ideas on how to improve haXe.

But then I thought, why buy this commercial compiler when I can just use haXe? I'll start digging into haXe again, mainly for flash and iPhone. 

Is haXe C/CPP output mature enough for producing iPhone apps? 

Also, another thing that I'd love to do is hack into OCaml to contribute to haXe's current generators and perhaps build new ones (a ruby one would be cool) and the language itself. Where should I start? Are there any docs on how to create a new generator, for ex?

Anyway, just touching base to see where haXe is and where it is heading. I've been off this mailing list for too long :)

Cheers,

Marcelo.

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Exploring haXe, again.

jlm@justinfront.net
Marcelo

Have you used Monkey... I got the impression it was a spoof, but maybe I was biased by 'horsey', presses arrow and frolics.


Anyway HaXe is good but it has no horsey.

From what I have seen haXe seems to be more suited to app mobile development than the adobe alternative but it still fairly young and setup can sometimes be tricky so its not fully ready for mass market development but there has been a lot of progress recently on fixing setup issues so hopefully most issues will be fully resolved by the next release but with persistence I am sure you can haXe a game on a phone, also haXe javascript seems to work fine on phones from my tests, and as well as the hxcpp I believe you can also use Appcelerator/Titanium with haXe, so the futures bright.  HaXe is being used commercial and not just by sole developers, and often for more than one target, I think there are still many that regard it as experimental, but reality is that they will probably be left behind as the early adopters take a very stable and powerful language to new levels, I have always thought haxe is where Ruby was before rails really took off, so get on the boat now ;)

In terms of the compiler documentation and new targets etc... I believe you should start here...


In terms of IDE's, I would say that many are popular - it depends who you ask, but generally FDT on a PC is currently the favorite and has the best support, I am not sure there is a clear favorite for linux platform but lots of options and many more opinions.


look forward to seeing your progress, get stuck in and come back with some deeper questions.


Cheers

;j



On 21 Jul 2011, at 01:26, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa wrote:

Hey guys,

I've been away from Flash and haXe for almost 4 years. In fact, I never really used haXe for more than a few toy projects for learning purposes. However, I always felt that haXe was the next big thing and that I should have been using it to create cool stuff.

Happened that time passed by and I started using ruby and rails. I love ruby, and nowadays I'm a software engineer mainly using ruby (and its web frameworks) in my day-job.

The other day, I was searching the web and found the new project by Blitz Research, called Monkey: [http://www.monkeycoder.co.nz/] -  It's seems to be pretty cool, and is basically follows the same ideas haXe does. It might also bring you guys some ideas on how to improve haXe.

But then I thought, why buy this commercial compiler when I can just use haXe? I'll start digging into haXe again, mainly for flash and iPhone. 

Is haXe C/CPP output mature enough for producing iPhone apps? 

Also, another thing that I'd love to do is hack into OCaml to contribute to haXe's current generators and perhaps build new ones (a ruby one would be cool) and the language itself. Where should I start? Are there any docs on how to create a new generator, for ex?

Anyway, just touching base to see where haXe is and where it is heading. I've been off this mailing list for too long :)

Cheers,

Marcelo.
--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Exploring haXe, again.

jlm@justinfront.net
( Opps I ment FD - Flash Develop on PC... but FDT is getting better all the time and probably works on linux but its a paid option. )

On 21 Jul 2011, at 02:59, [hidden email] wrote:

Marcelo

Have you used Monkey... I got the impression it was a spoof, but maybe I was biased by 'horsey', presses arrow and frolics.


Anyway HaXe is good but it has no horsey.

From what I have seen haXe seems to be more suited to app mobile development than the adobe alternative but it still fairly young and setup can sometimes be tricky so its not fully ready for mass market development but there has been a lot of progress recently on fixing setup issues so hopefully most issues will be fully resolved by the next release but with persistence I am sure you can haXe a game on a phone, also haXe javascript seems to work fine on phones from my tests, and as well as the hxcpp I believe you can also use Appcelerator/Titanium with haXe, so the futures bright.  HaXe is being used commercial and not just by sole developers, and often for more than one target, I think there are still many that regard it as experimental, but reality is that they will probably be left behind as the early adopters take a very stable and powerful language to new levels, I have always thought haxe is where Ruby was before rails really took off, so get on the boat now ;)

In terms of the compiler documentation and new targets etc... I believe you should start here...


In terms of IDE's, I would say that many are popular - it depends who you ask, but generally FDT on a PC is currently the favorite and has the best support, I am not sure there is a clear favorite for linux platform but lots of options and many more opinions.


look forward to seeing your progress, get stuck in and come back with some deeper questions.


Cheers

;j



On 21 Jul 2011, at 01:26, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa wrote:

Hey guys,

I've been away from Flash and haXe for almost 4 years. In fact, I never really used haXe for more than a few toy projects for learning purposes. However, I always felt that haXe was the next big thing and that I should have been using it to create cool stuff.

Happened that time passed by and I started using ruby and rails. I love ruby, and nowadays I'm a software engineer mainly using ruby (and its web frameworks) in my day-job.

The other day, I was searching the web and found the new project by Blitz Research, called Monkey: [http://www.monkeycoder.co.nz/] -  It's seems to be pretty cool, and is basically follows the same ideas haXe does. It might also bring you guys some ideas on how to improve haXe.

But then I thought, why buy this commercial compiler when I can just use haXe? I'll start digging into haXe again, mainly for flash and iPhone. 

Is haXe C/CPP output mature enough for producing iPhone apps? 

Also, another thing that I'd love to do is hack into OCaml to contribute to haXe's current generators and perhaps build new ones (a ruby one would be cool) and the language itself. Where should I start? Are there any docs on how to create a new generator, for ex?

Anyway, just touching base to see where haXe is and where it is heading. I've been off this mailing list for too long :)

Cheers,

Marcelo.
--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Exploring haXe, again.

Marcelo de Moraes Serpa
In reply to this post by jlm@justinfront.net
Hi Jim,

Thanks for the comprehensive answer.

Have you used Monkey... I got the impression it was a spoof, but maybe I was biased by 'horsey', presses arrow and frolics.

No, I haven't use it, but I did use Blitz3D some years ago, and albeit it was Basic, the platform was very nice and compiled games ran very fast. Its 3D engine was also really good at the time - you can see many successful commercial games that were built in Blitz 3D.

That being said, I'm not trying to sell Blitz or Monkey :) Just that, being that I had a good impression with Blitz 3D, it influenced my pre-judgement for Monkey, although I'm not sure yet how good it is. 

It *seems* like a good solution for native iPhone apps (I'm looking for an high-level language to quickly prototype games, I don't really like ObjectiveC, I'd rather not use it, at least not for the whole application). Check the sample apps, there are already some commercial iPhone apps that were made with it.

The approach Monkey uses is interesting, and akin to haXe's one. It is basically a translator - and it differs in this sense from the haXe's flash compiler, which I'd is much better - and you are encouraged to use extern components (classes, methods, assets) if you couldn't do it with Monkey alone. That's the 80/20 rule in action.

I'm sure haXe also has the same capabilities for extern resources, but unfortunately, I did not have a chance to really grasp it with its gotchas.

For me, haXe wins for flash and server-side web application development. Monkey seems better suited for iPhone apps (as well as Android). It even supports XNA through C# (Not that it interests me, but interesting nevertheless).

I like haXe's language better, but Monkey's Basic-flavored one isn't bad either. 

The problem with haXe, as of now, is that it doesn't have too much to show. It needs more press. I know it's very powerful and that it has lots of potential, but it's still obscure in many ways. It needs more community support, specially for the other generators. I know it's a chicken-and-egg situation and that eventually it will come, it's just an observation.

I will start to play around with it, though. Words are only words, and I value action. I'll see if there's a way to contribute to the project in any ways, I believe it has lots of potential.

Cheers,

Marcelo.



On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 8:59 PM, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
Marcelo

Have you used Monkey... I got the impression it was a spoof, but maybe I was biased by 'horsey', presses arrow and frolics.


Anyway HaXe is good but it has no horsey.

From what I have seen haXe seems to be more suited to app mobile development than the adobe alternative but it still fairly young and setup can sometimes be tricky so its not fully ready for mass market development but there has been a lot of progress recently on fixing setup issues so hopefully most issues will be fully resolved by the next release but with persistence I am sure you can haXe a game on a phone, also haXe javascript seems to work fine on phones from my tests, and as well as the hxcpp I believe you can also use Appcelerator/Titanium with haXe, so the futures bright.  HaXe is being used commercial and not just by sole developers, and often for more than one target, I think there are still many that regard it as experimental, but reality is that they will probably be left behind as the early adopters take a very stable and powerful language to new levels, I have always thought haxe is where Ruby was before rails really took off, so get on the boat now ;)

In terms of the compiler documentation and new targets etc... I believe you should start here...


In terms of IDE's, I would say that many are popular - it depends who you ask, but generally FDT on a PC is currently the favorite and has the best support, I am not sure there is a clear favorite for linux platform but lots of options and many more opinions.


look forward to seeing your progress, get stuck in and come back with some deeper questions.


Cheers

;j



On 21 Jul 2011, at 01:26, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa wrote:

Hey guys,

I've been away from Flash and haXe for almost 4 years. In fact, I never really used haXe for more than a few toy projects for learning purposes. However, I always felt that haXe was the next big thing and that I should have been using it to create cool stuff.

Happened that time passed by and I started using ruby and rails. I love ruby, and nowadays I'm a software engineer mainly using ruby (and its web frameworks) in my day-job.

The other day, I was searching the web and found the new project by Blitz Research, called Monkey: [http://www.monkeycoder.co.nz/] -  It's seems to be pretty cool, and is basically follows the same ideas haXe does. It might also bring you guys some ideas on how to improve haXe.

But then I thought, why buy this commercial compiler when I can just use haXe? I'll start digging into haXe again, mainly for flash and iPhone. 

Is haXe C/CPP output mature enough for producing iPhone apps? 

Also, another thing that I'd love to do is hack into OCaml to contribute to haXe's current generators and perhaps build new ones (a ruby one would be cool) and the language itself. Where should I start? Are there any docs on how to create a new generator, for ex?

Anyway, just touching base to see where haXe is and where it is heading. I've been off this mailing list for too long :)

Cheers,

Marcelo.
--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Exploring haXe, again.

Marcelo de Moraes Serpa
In reply to this post by jlm@justinfront.net
I'm not an IDE kind of guy (anymore). I use MacVim and eventually Emacs :), so, even with all its bells and whistles, I'm too used to the simplicity and flexibility of good old Vim I would never go back to Eclipse or any other IDE for that matter.

On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 9:10 PM, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
( Opps I ment FD - Flash Develop on PC... but FDT is getting better all the time and probably works on linux but its a paid option. )

On 21 Jul 2011, at 02:59, [hidden email] wrote:

Marcelo

Have you used Monkey... I got the impression it was a spoof, but maybe I was biased by 'horsey', presses arrow and frolics.


Anyway HaXe is good but it has no horsey.

From what I have seen haXe seems to be more suited to app mobile development than the adobe alternative but it still fairly young and setup can sometimes be tricky so its not fully ready for mass market development but there has been a lot of progress recently on fixing setup issues so hopefully most issues will be fully resolved by the next release but with persistence I am sure you can haXe a game on a phone, also haXe javascript seems to work fine on phones from my tests, and as well as the hxcpp I believe you can also use Appcelerator/Titanium with haXe, so the futures bright.  HaXe is being used commercial and not just by sole developers, and often for more than one target, I think there are still many that regard it as experimental, but reality is that they will probably be left behind as the early adopters take a very stable and powerful language to new levels, I have always thought haxe is where Ruby was before rails really took off, so get on the boat now ;)

In terms of the compiler documentation and new targets etc... I believe you should start here...


In terms of IDE's, I would say that many are popular - it depends who you ask, but generally FDT on a PC is currently the favorite and has the best support, I am not sure there is a clear favorite for linux platform but lots of options and many more opinions.


look forward to seeing your progress, get stuck in and come back with some deeper questions.


Cheers

;j



On 21 Jul 2011, at 01:26, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa wrote:

Hey guys,

I've been away from Flash and haXe for almost 4 years. In fact, I never really used haXe for more than a few toy projects for learning purposes. However, I always felt that haXe was the next big thing and that I should have been using it to create cool stuff.

Happened that time passed by and I started using ruby and rails. I love ruby, and nowadays I'm a software engineer mainly using ruby (and its web frameworks) in my day-job.

The other day, I was searching the web and found the new project by Blitz Research, called Monkey: [http://www.monkeycoder.co.nz/] -  It's seems to be pretty cool, and is basically follows the same ideas haXe does. It might also bring you guys some ideas on how to improve haXe.

But then I thought, why buy this commercial compiler when I can just use haXe? I'll start digging into haXe again, mainly for flash and iPhone. 

Is haXe C/CPP output mature enough for producing iPhone apps? 

Also, another thing that I'd love to do is hack into OCaml to contribute to haXe's current generators and perhaps build new ones (a ruby one would be cool) and the language itself. Where should I start? Are there any docs on how to create a new generator, for ex?

Anyway, just touching base to see where haXe is and where it is heading. I've been off this mailing list for too long :)

Cheers,

Marcelo.
--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Exploring haXe, again.

Marcelo de Moraes Serpa
Ops, when I said "I'd say it's much better", I meant the haXe compiler, not the monkey one. haXe's compiles to bytecode, while Monkey translates to AS3.

Cheers,

Marcelo.

On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 9:19 PM, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm not an IDE kind of guy (anymore). I use MacVim and eventually Emacs :), so, even with all its bells and whistles, I'm too used to the simplicity and flexibility of good old Vim I would never go back to Eclipse or any other IDE for that matter.

On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 9:10 PM, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
( Opps I ment FD - Flash Develop on PC... but FDT is getting better all the time and probably works on linux but its a paid option. )

On 21 Jul 2011, at 02:59, [hidden email] wrote:

Marcelo

Have you used Monkey... I got the impression it was a spoof, but maybe I was biased by 'horsey', presses arrow and frolics.


Anyway HaXe is good but it has no horsey.

From what I have seen haXe seems to be more suited to app mobile development than the adobe alternative but it still fairly young and setup can sometimes be tricky so its not fully ready for mass market development but there has been a lot of progress recently on fixing setup issues so hopefully most issues will be fully resolved by the next release but with persistence I am sure you can haXe a game on a phone, also haXe javascript seems to work fine on phones from my tests, and as well as the hxcpp I believe you can also use Appcelerator/Titanium with haXe, so the futures bright.  HaXe is being used commercial and not just by sole developers, and often for more than one target, I think there are still many that regard it as experimental, but reality is that they will probably be left behind as the early adopters take a very stable and powerful language to new levels, I have always thought haxe is where Ruby was before rails really took off, so get on the boat now ;)

In terms of the compiler documentation and new targets etc... I believe you should start here...


In terms of IDE's, I would say that many are popular - it depends who you ask, but generally FDT on a PC is currently the favorite and has the best support, I am not sure there is a clear favorite for linux platform but lots of options and many more opinions.


look forward to seeing your progress, get stuck in and come back with some deeper questions.


Cheers

;j



On 21 Jul 2011, at 01:26, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa wrote:

Hey guys,

I've been away from Flash and haXe for almost 4 years. In fact, I never really used haXe for more than a few toy projects for learning purposes. However, I always felt that haXe was the next big thing and that I should have been using it to create cool stuff.

Happened that time passed by and I started using ruby and rails. I love ruby, and nowadays I'm a software engineer mainly using ruby (and its web frameworks) in my day-job.

The other day, I was searching the web and found the new project by Blitz Research, called Monkey: [http://www.monkeycoder.co.nz/] -  It's seems to be pretty cool, and is basically follows the same ideas haXe does. It might also bring you guys some ideas on how to improve haXe.

But then I thought, why buy this commercial compiler when I can just use haXe? I'll start digging into haXe again, mainly for flash and iPhone. 

Is haXe C/CPP output mature enough for producing iPhone apps? 

Also, another thing that I'd love to do is hack into OCaml to contribute to haXe's current generators and perhaps build new ones (a ruby one would be cool) and the language itself. Where should I start? Are there any docs on how to create a new generator, for ex?

Anyway, just touching base to see where haXe is and where it is heading. I've been off this mailing list for too long :)

Cheers,

Marcelo.
--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--

haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org



--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Exploring haXe, again.

Marcelo de Moraes Serpa
The haxe *flash* compiler.

On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 9:21 PM, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa <[hidden email]> wrote:
Ops, when I said "I'd say it's much better", I meant the haXe compiler, not the monkey one. haXe's compiles to bytecode, while Monkey translates to AS3.

Cheers,

Marcelo.


On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 9:19 PM, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm not an IDE kind of guy (anymore). I use MacVim and eventually Emacs :), so, even with all its bells and whistles, I'm too used to the simplicity and flexibility of good old Vim I would never go back to Eclipse or any other IDE for that matter.

On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 9:10 PM, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
( Opps I ment FD - Flash Develop on PC... but FDT is getting better all the time and probably works on linux but its a paid option. )

On 21 Jul 2011, at 02:59, [hidden email] wrote:

Marcelo

Have you used Monkey... I got the impression it was a spoof, but maybe I was biased by 'horsey', presses arrow and frolics.


Anyway HaXe is good but it has no horsey.

From what I have seen haXe seems to be more suited to app mobile development than the adobe alternative but it still fairly young and setup can sometimes be tricky so its not fully ready for mass market development but there has been a lot of progress recently on fixing setup issues so hopefully most issues will be fully resolved by the next release but with persistence I am sure you can haXe a game on a phone, also haXe javascript seems to work fine on phones from my tests, and as well as the hxcpp I believe you can also use Appcelerator/Titanium with haXe, so the futures bright.  HaXe is being used commercial and not just by sole developers, and often for more than one target, I think there are still many that regard it as experimental, but reality is that they will probably be left behind as the early adopters take a very stable and powerful language to new levels, I have always thought haxe is where Ruby was before rails really took off, so get on the boat now ;)

In terms of the compiler documentation and new targets etc... I believe you should start here...


In terms of IDE's, I would say that many are popular - it depends who you ask, but generally FDT on a PC is currently the favorite and has the best support, I am not sure there is a clear favorite for linux platform but lots of options and many more opinions.


look forward to seeing your progress, get stuck in and come back with some deeper questions.


Cheers

;j



On 21 Jul 2011, at 01:26, Marcelo de Moraes Serpa wrote:

Hey guys,

I've been away from Flash and haXe for almost 4 years. In fact, I never really used haXe for more than a few toy projects for learning purposes. However, I always felt that haXe was the next big thing and that I should have been using it to create cool stuff.

Happened that time passed by and I started using ruby and rails. I love ruby, and nowadays I'm a software engineer mainly using ruby (and its web frameworks) in my day-job.

The other day, I was searching the web and found the new project by Blitz Research, called Monkey: [http://www.monkeycoder.co.nz/] -  It's seems to be pretty cool, and is basically follows the same ideas haXe does. It might also bring you guys some ideas on how to improve haXe.

But then I thought, why buy this commercial compiler when I can just use haXe? I'll start digging into haXe again, mainly for flash and iPhone. 

Is haXe C/CPP output mature enough for producing iPhone apps? 

Also, another thing that I'd love to do is hack into OCaml to contribute to haXe's current generators and perhaps build new ones (a ruby one would be cool) and the language itself. Where should I start? Are there any docs on how to create a new generator, for ex?

Anyway, just touching base to see where haXe is and where it is heading. I've been off this mailing list for too long :)

Cheers,

Marcelo.
--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--

haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org




--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org