Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation (Flex Adandoned)

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Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation (Flex Adandoned)

jamesbjackson
Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation; Continues Fire Sale on Formerly-Core Software

Hot on the heels of news that Adobe is abandoning developing Flash for mobile devices, Adobe has also now announced its intention to donate the Flex SDK to "an established open source foundation".

It isn't entirely clear from the information available so far whether the open source Foundation Adobe has in mind is the Open Spoon Foundation, which was established in July 2011 and has announced that it is working with Adobe on the move, or a better known alternative such as the Apache Foundation. It was the latter to which Adobe donated PhoneGap after their acquisition of Nitobi. InfoQ spoke to the Open Spoon Foundation Board to try and get more information from them, but they explained that details are still being worked out. They did offer us this statement

The membership of the Open Spoon Foundation is made up of Flex thought leaders and community members. We have worked closely with Adobe to create an open source project which worked similar to the relationship of the Fedora and Red Hat organizations. In fact, the name of our organization, Spoon, was a play on words about this being a more subtle effort than a fork of the Flex SDK code. Our goal was to keep the community and code as unified as possible.

Very recently, Adobe proposed a new idea for the transition to open source. It is grander than the original and we believe it will allow things to move forward at an accelerated pace with more investment from both Adobe and the community. As part of that effort, the Flex SDK will be donated to a different established foundation, for example an Apache, and the project leadership will be made up of both Adobe representatives and community members, including many from the Open Spoon Foundation.

It has to be said that this optimism doesn't seem to be all that widely shared. According to the FAQ document Adobe released on Friday, the firm will continue to develop Flash Builder, the Eclipse-based IDE for Flex applications. However even in the FAQ Adobe makes it clear that it believes enterprise developers should be focusing attention on HTML 5, and not on Flex, in the future. "In the long-term, we believe HTML5 will be the best technology for enterprise application development," the firm writes.

As you might expect, Adobe's FAQ document has generated some angry reaction from developers. One post, in reference to Adobe's comments about HTML 5, reads

Tell me which enterprise will now invest in large-scale Flex project when Adobe makes that kind of statement on their official blog. I seriously can't understand at all why this has happened all of sudden, it's like a true nightmare.

Another developer writes
"I've invested years developing significant proficiency in Flex. It now feels like a waste of time. I'm sure there are a lot of enterprise customers with large investments in Flex wondering the same thing. Why is there no clear migration plan? Why is Adobe abandoning Flex so suddenly? HTML5/JS/CSS still has significant issues with compatibility. We have built large, sophisticated rich internet applications that were only possible due to the ability of AS3 and Flex to support large scale object-oriented development. We don't build simple web apps, we build complex data visualization tools that our customers love. What are we going to tell our customers now? Sorry, Flex is dead and HTML5 isn't quite there yet, let's try again in a couple years?"

You can see the FAQ document here: http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html
And the actual post this is from here: http://www.infoq.com/news/2011/11/flex-adandoned

Interesting shake up in the web applications and general development.
What next the entire flash platform?

James
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Re: Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation (Flex Adandoned)

Juan Delgado
This is to me FAR more important than Adobe dropping the mobile
version of the player.

Any decent Flash development is being done using the FlexSDK as a
compiler (or haxe), so if they drop the FlexSDK and not the Flash
Player, how long is going to take for the new foundation to catch up
with new versions of the player? How's that new foundation going to be
funded? As far as I know, FlashBuilder, FDT, FlashDevelop, etc, they
all use the FlexSDK to compile, what are those guys going to do?

And I don't think that Adobe would release the player. The FlexSDK has
been Open Source from day one, but not the Flash Player that has about
10 years of legacy code to support. I bet is not precisely clean. Even
putting 3rd party libraries aside, releasing the player would be a
massive job for Adobe to gain what? Did they ever release Director's
runtime source code?



On Tue, Nov 15, 2011 at 1:47 PM, jamesbjackson <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation; Continues Fire Sale on
> Formerly-Core Software
>
> Hot on the heels of news that Adobe is abandoning developing Flash for
> mobile devices, Adobe has also now announced its intention to donate the
> Flex SDK to "an established open source foundation".
>
> It isn't entirely clear from the information available so far whether the
> open source Foundation Adobe has in mind is the Open Spoon Foundation, which
> was established in July 2011 and has announced that it is working with Adobe
> on the move, or a better known alternative such as the Apache Foundation. It
> was the latter to which Adobe donated PhoneGap after their acquisition of
> Nitobi. InfoQ spoke to the Open Spoon Foundation Board to try and get more
> information from them, but they explained that details are still being
> worked out. They did offer us this statement
>
> The membership of the Open Spoon Foundation is made up of Flex thought
> leaders and community members. We have worked closely with Adobe to create
> an open source project which worked similar to the relationship of the
> Fedora and Red Hat organizations. In fact, the name of our organization,
> Spoon, was a play on words about this being a more subtle effort than a fork
> of the Flex SDK code. Our goal was to keep the community and code as unified
> as possible.
>
> Very recently, Adobe proposed a new idea for the transition to open source.
> It is grander than the original and we believe it will allow things to move
> forward at an accelerated pace with more investment from both Adobe and the
> community. As part of that effort, the Flex SDK will be donated to a
> different established foundation, for example an Apache, and the project
> leadership will be made up of both Adobe representatives and community
> members, including many from the Open Spoon Foundation.
>
> It has to be said that this optimism doesn't seem to be all that widely
> shared. According to the FAQ document Adobe released on Friday, the firm
> will continue to develop Flash Builder, the Eclipse-based IDE for Flex
> applications. However even in the FAQ Adobe makes it clear that it believes
> enterprise developers should be focusing attention on HTML 5, and not on
> Flex, in the future. "/In the long-term, we believe HTML5 will be the best
> technology for enterprise application development/," the firm writes.
>
> As you might expect, Adobe's FAQ document has generated some angry reaction
> from developers. One post, in reference to Adobe's comments about HTML 5,
> reads
>
> Tell me which enterprise will now invest in large-scale Flex project when
> Adobe makes that kind of statement on their official blog. I seriously can't
> understand at all why this has happened all of sudden, it's like a true
> nightmare.
>
> Another developer writes
> "/I've invested years developing significant proficiency in Flex. It now
> feels like a waste of time. I'm sure there are a lot of enterprise customers
> with large investments in Flex wondering the same thing. Why is there no
> clear migration plan? Why is Adobe abandoning Flex so suddenly? HTML5/JS/CSS
> still has significant issues with compatibility. We have built large,
> sophisticated rich internet applications that were only possible due to the
> ability of AS3 and Flex to support large scale object-oriented development.
> We don't build simple web apps, we build complex data visualization tools
> that our customers love. What are we going to tell our customers now? Sorry,
> Flex is dead and HTML5 isn't quite there yet, let's try again in a couple
> years?/"
>
> You can see the FAQ document here:
> http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html
> And the actual post this is from here:
> http://www.infoq.com/news/2011/11/flex-adandoned
>
> Interesting shake up in the web applications and general development.
> What next the entire flash platform?
>
> James
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://haxe.1354130.n2.nabble.com/Adobe-Donating-Flex-to-Open-Source-Foundation-Flex-Adandoned-tp6996328p6996328.html
> Sent from the Haxe mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>



--
Juan Delgado - Zárate
http://zarate.tv
http://blog.zarate.tv

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation (Flex Adandoned)

Juraj Kirchheim
In reply to this post by jamesbjackson
The second part of your headline is fear-mongering.

Firstly, Adobe donated Tamarin to the Mozilla Foundation a while ago,
which is something nobody really cared about, because the AVM2  is not
really a product or brand, as Flex is. At the same time this shows,
that an open source donation by Adobe is nothing like abandoning.

Secondly, I don't think this is a bad move. Until now I kept my
distance from Flex, because it all felt so corporate to me. Very
"professional", which basically means, that you can't get anything
done without using at least two dozen acronyms. Who knows where Flex
will go now. You seem to forget, that some of the greatest treasures
among programming tools are open source, including haXe.

On Tue, Nov 15, 2011 at 2:47 PM, jamesbjackson <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation; Continues Fire Sale on
> Formerly-Core Software
>
> Hot on the heels of news that Adobe is abandoning developing Flash for
> mobile devices, Adobe has also now announced its intention to donate the
> Flex SDK to "an established open source foundation".
>
> It isn't entirely clear from the information available so far whether the
> open source Foundation Adobe has in mind is the Open Spoon Foundation, which
> was established in July 2011 and has announced that it is working with Adobe
> on the move, or a better known alternative such as the Apache Foundation. It
> was the latter to which Adobe donated PhoneGap after their acquisition of
> Nitobi. InfoQ spoke to the Open Spoon Foundation Board to try and get more
> information from them, but they explained that details are still being
> worked out. They did offer us this statement
>
> The membership of the Open Spoon Foundation is made up of Flex thought
> leaders and community members. We have worked closely with Adobe to create
> an open source project which worked similar to the relationship of the
> Fedora and Red Hat organizations. In fact, the name of our organization,
> Spoon, was a play on words about this being a more subtle effort than a fork
> of the Flex SDK code. Our goal was to keep the community and code as unified
> as possible.
>
> Very recently, Adobe proposed a new idea for the transition to open source.
> It is grander than the original and we believe it will allow things to move
> forward at an accelerated pace with more investment from both Adobe and the
> community. As part of that effort, the Flex SDK will be donated to a
> different established foundation, for example an Apache, and the project
> leadership will be made up of both Adobe representatives and community
> members, including many from the Open Spoon Foundation.
>
> It has to be said that this optimism doesn't seem to be all that widely
> shared. According to the FAQ document Adobe released on Friday, the firm
> will continue to develop Flash Builder, the Eclipse-based IDE for Flex
> applications. However even in the FAQ Adobe makes it clear that it believes
> enterprise developers should be focusing attention on HTML 5, and not on
> Flex, in the future. "/In the long-term, we believe HTML5 will be the best
> technology for enterprise application development/," the firm writes.
>
> As you might expect, Adobe's FAQ document has generated some angry reaction
> from developers. One post, in reference to Adobe's comments about HTML 5,
> reads
>
> Tell me which enterprise will now invest in large-scale Flex project when
> Adobe makes that kind of statement on their official blog. I seriously can't
> understand at all why this has happened all of sudden, it's like a true
> nightmare.
>
> Another developer writes
> "/I've invested years developing significant proficiency in Flex. It now
> feels like a waste of time. I'm sure there are a lot of enterprise customers
> with large investments in Flex wondering the same thing. Why is there no
> clear migration plan? Why is Adobe abandoning Flex so suddenly? HTML5/JS/CSS
> still has significant issues with compatibility. We have built large,
> sophisticated rich internet applications that were only possible due to the
> ability of AS3 and Flex to support large scale object-oriented development.
> We don't build simple web apps, we build complex data visualization tools
> that our customers love. What are we going to tell our customers now? Sorry,
> Flex is dead and HTML5 isn't quite there yet, let's try again in a couple
> years?/"
>
> You can see the FAQ document here:
> http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html
> And the actual post this is from here:
> http://www.infoq.com/news/2011/11/flex-adandoned
>
> Interesting shake up in the web applications and general development.
> What next the entire flash platform?
>
> James
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://haxe.1354130.n2.nabble.com/Adobe-Donating-Flex-to-Open-Source-Foundation-Flex-Adandoned-tp6996328p6996328.html
> Sent from the Haxe mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation (Flex Adandoned)

Lars Madson
Next move, give Flash Player to Haxe foundation!

Laurent

2011/11/15 Juraj Kirchheim <[hidden email]>
The second part of your headline is fear-mongering.

Firstly, Adobe donated Tamarin to the Mozilla Foundation a while ago,
which is something nobody really cared about, because the AVM2  is not
really a product or brand, as Flex is. At the same time this shows,
that an open source donation by Adobe is nothing like abandoning.

Secondly, I don't think this is a bad move. Until now I kept my
distance from Flex, because it all felt so corporate to me. Very
"professional", which basically means, that you can't get anything
done without using at least two dozen acronyms. Who knows where Flex
will go now. You seem to forget, that some of the greatest treasures
among programming tools are open source, including haXe.

On Tue, Nov 15, 2011 at 2:47 PM, jamesbjackson <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation; Continues Fire Sale on
> Formerly-Core Software
>
> Hot on the heels of news that Adobe is abandoning developing Flash for
> mobile devices, Adobe has also now announced its intention to donate the
> Flex SDK to "an established open source foundation".
>
> It isn't entirely clear from the information available so far whether the
> open source Foundation Adobe has in mind is the Open Spoon Foundation, which
> was established in July 2011 and has announced that it is working with Adobe
> on the move, or a better known alternative such as the Apache Foundation. It
> was the latter to which Adobe donated PhoneGap after their acquisition of
> Nitobi. InfoQ spoke to the Open Spoon Foundation Board to try and get more
> information from them, but they explained that details are still being
> worked out. They did offer us this statement
>
> The membership of the Open Spoon Foundation is made up of Flex thought
> leaders and community members. We have worked closely with Adobe to create
> an open source project which worked similar to the relationship of the
> Fedora and Red Hat organizations. In fact, the name of our organization,
> Spoon, was a play on words about this being a more subtle effort than a fork
> of the Flex SDK code. Our goal was to keep the community and code as unified
> as possible.
>
> Very recently, Adobe proposed a new idea for the transition to open source.
> It is grander than the original and we believe it will allow things to move
> forward at an accelerated pace with more investment from both Adobe and the
> community. As part of that effort, the Flex SDK will be donated to a
> different established foundation, for example an Apache, and the project
> leadership will be made up of both Adobe representatives and community
> members, including many from the Open Spoon Foundation.
>
> It has to be said that this optimism doesn't seem to be all that widely
> shared. According to the FAQ document Adobe released on Friday, the firm
> will continue to develop Flash Builder, the Eclipse-based IDE for Flex
> applications. However even in the FAQ Adobe makes it clear that it believes
> enterprise developers should be focusing attention on HTML 5, and not on
> Flex, in the future. "/In the long-term, we believe HTML5 will be the best
> technology for enterprise application development/," the firm writes.
>
> As you might expect, Adobe's FAQ document has generated some angry reaction
> from developers. One post, in reference to Adobe's comments about HTML 5,
> reads
>
> Tell me which enterprise will now invest in large-scale Flex project when
> Adobe makes that kind of statement on their official blog. I seriously can't
> understand at all why this has happened all of sudden, it's like a true
> nightmare.
>
> Another developer writes
> "/I've invested years developing significant proficiency in Flex. It now
> feels like a waste of time. I'm sure there are a lot of enterprise customers
> with large investments in Flex wondering the same thing. Why is there no
> clear migration plan? Why is Adobe abandoning Flex so suddenly? HTML5/JS/CSS
> still has significant issues with compatibility. We have built large,
> sophisticated rich internet applications that were only possible due to the
> ability of AS3 and Flex to support large scale object-oriented development.
> We don't build simple web apps, we build complex data visualization tools
> that our customers love. What are we going to tell our customers now? Sorry,
> Flex is dead and HTML5 isn't quite there yet, let's try again in a couple
> years?/"
>
> You can see the FAQ document here:
> http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html
> And the actual post this is from here:
> http://www.infoq.com/news/2011/11/flex-adandoned
>
> Interesting shake up in the web applications and general development.
> What next the entire flash platform?
>
> James
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://haxe.1354130.n2.nabble.com/Adobe-Donating-Flex-to-Open-Source-Foundation-Flex-Adandoned-tp6996328p6996328.html
> Sent from the Haxe mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation (Flex Adandoned)

Adrian Cowan
+1 :P

On Wed, Nov 16, 2011 at 10:31 PM, Lars Madson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Next move, give Flash Player to Haxe foundation!

Laurent


2011/11/15 Juraj Kirchheim <[hidden email]>
The second part of your headline is fear-mongering.

Firstly, Adobe donated Tamarin to the Mozilla Foundation a while ago,
which is something nobody really cared about, because the AVM2  is not
really a product or brand, as Flex is. At the same time this shows,
that an open source donation by Adobe is nothing like abandoning.

Secondly, I don't think this is a bad move. Until now I kept my
distance from Flex, because it all felt so corporate to me. Very
"professional", which basically means, that you can't get anything
done without using at least two dozen acronyms. Who knows where Flex
will go now. You seem to forget, that some of the greatest treasures
among programming tools are open source, including haXe.

On Tue, Nov 15, 2011 at 2:47 PM, jamesbjackson <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation; Continues Fire Sale on
> Formerly-Core Software
>
> Hot on the heels of news that Adobe is abandoning developing Flash for
> mobile devices, Adobe has also now announced its intention to donate the
> Flex SDK to "an established open source foundation".
>
> It isn't entirely clear from the information available so far whether the
> open source Foundation Adobe has in mind is the Open Spoon Foundation, which
> was established in July 2011 and has announced that it is working with Adobe
> on the move, or a better known alternative such as the Apache Foundation. It
> was the latter to which Adobe donated PhoneGap after their acquisition of
> Nitobi. InfoQ spoke to the Open Spoon Foundation Board to try and get more
> information from them, but they explained that details are still being
> worked out. They did offer us this statement
>
> The membership of the Open Spoon Foundation is made up of Flex thought
> leaders and community members. We have worked closely with Adobe to create
> an open source project which worked similar to the relationship of the
> Fedora and Red Hat organizations. In fact, the name of our organization,
> Spoon, was a play on words about this being a more subtle effort than a fork
> of the Flex SDK code. Our goal was to keep the community and code as unified
> as possible.
>
> Very recently, Adobe proposed a new idea for the transition to open source.
> It is grander than the original and we believe it will allow things to move
> forward at an accelerated pace with more investment from both Adobe and the
> community. As part of that effort, the Flex SDK will be donated to a
> different established foundation, for example an Apache, and the project
> leadership will be made up of both Adobe representatives and community
> members, including many from the Open Spoon Foundation.
>
> It has to be said that this optimism doesn't seem to be all that widely
> shared. According to the FAQ document Adobe released on Friday, the firm
> will continue to develop Flash Builder, the Eclipse-based IDE for Flex
> applications. However even in the FAQ Adobe makes it clear that it believes
> enterprise developers should be focusing attention on HTML 5, and not on
> Flex, in the future. "/In the long-term, we believe HTML5 will be the best
> technology for enterprise application development/," the firm writes.
>
> As you might expect, Adobe's FAQ document has generated some angry reaction
> from developers. One post, in reference to Adobe's comments about HTML 5,
> reads
>
> Tell me which enterprise will now invest in large-scale Flex project when
> Adobe makes that kind of statement on their official blog. I seriously can't
> understand at all why this has happened all of sudden, it's like a true
> nightmare.
>
> Another developer writes
> "/I've invested years developing significant proficiency in Flex. It now
> feels like a waste of time. I'm sure there are a lot of enterprise customers
> with large investments in Flex wondering the same thing. Why is there no
> clear migration plan? Why is Adobe abandoning Flex so suddenly? HTML5/JS/CSS
> still has significant issues with compatibility. We have built large,
> sophisticated rich internet applications that were only possible due to the
> ability of AS3 and Flex to support large scale object-oriented development.
> We don't build simple web apps, we build complex data visualization tools
> that our customers love. What are we going to tell our customers now? Sorry,
> Flex is dead and HTML5 isn't quite there yet, let's try again in a couple
> years?/"
>
> You can see the FAQ document here:
> http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html
> And the actual post this is from here:
> http://www.infoq.com/news/2011/11/flex-adandoned
>
> Interesting shake up in the web applications and general development.
> What next the entire flash platform?
>
> James
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://haxe.1354130.n2.nabble.com/Adobe-Donating-Flex-to-Open-Source-Foundation-Flex-Adandoned-tp6996328p6996328.html
> Sent from the Haxe mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org
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Re: Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation (Flex Adandoned)

Alex Liebert
it's not clear to me yet  what 'flex' means in this context - is it really the mxmlc compiler (i would think they must continue developing this first party in conjunction with AIR and Flash desktop) or is the mess of flex 'framework' stuff?

On Wed, Nov 16, 2011 at 3:45 AM, Adrian Cowan <[hidden email]> wrote:
+1 :P


On Wed, Nov 16, 2011 at 10:31 PM, Lars Madson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Next move, give Flash Player to Haxe foundation!

Laurent


2011/11/15 Juraj Kirchheim <[hidden email]>
The second part of your headline is fear-mongering.

Firstly, Adobe donated Tamarin to the Mozilla Foundation a while ago,
which is something nobody really cared about, because the AVM2  is not
really a product or brand, as Flex is. At the same time this shows,
that an open source donation by Adobe is nothing like abandoning.

Secondly, I don't think this is a bad move. Until now I kept my
distance from Flex, because it all felt so corporate to me. Very
"professional", which basically means, that you can't get anything
done without using at least two dozen acronyms. Who knows where Flex
will go now. You seem to forget, that some of the greatest treasures
among programming tools are open source, including haXe.

On Tue, Nov 15, 2011 at 2:47 PM, jamesbjackson <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Adobe Donating Flex to Open Source Foundation; Continues Fire Sale on
> Formerly-Core Software
>
> Hot on the heels of news that Adobe is abandoning developing Flash for
> mobile devices, Adobe has also now announced its intention to donate the
> Flex SDK to "an established open source foundation".
>
> It isn't entirely clear from the information available so far whether the
> open source Foundation Adobe has in mind is the Open Spoon Foundation, which
> was established in July 2011 and has announced that it is working with Adobe
> on the move, or a better known alternative such as the Apache Foundation. It
> was the latter to which Adobe donated PhoneGap after their acquisition of
> Nitobi. InfoQ spoke to the Open Spoon Foundation Board to try and get more
> information from them, but they explained that details are still being
> worked out. They did offer us this statement
>
> The membership of the Open Spoon Foundation is made up of Flex thought
> leaders and community members. We have worked closely with Adobe to create
> an open source project which worked similar to the relationship of the
> Fedora and Red Hat organizations. In fact, the name of our organization,
> Spoon, was a play on words about this being a more subtle effort than a fork
> of the Flex SDK code. Our goal was to keep the community and code as unified
> as possible.
>
> Very recently, Adobe proposed a new idea for the transition to open source.
> It is grander than the original and we believe it will allow things to move
> forward at an accelerated pace with more investment from both Adobe and the
> community. As part of that effort, the Flex SDK will be donated to a
> different established foundation, for example an Apache, and the project
> leadership will be made up of both Adobe representatives and community
> members, including many from the Open Spoon Foundation.
>
> It has to be said that this optimism doesn't seem to be all that widely
> shared. According to the FAQ document Adobe released on Friday, the firm
> will continue to develop Flash Builder, the Eclipse-based IDE for Flex
> applications. However even in the FAQ Adobe makes it clear that it believes
> enterprise developers should be focusing attention on HTML 5, and not on
> Flex, in the future. "/In the long-term, we believe HTML5 will be the best
> technology for enterprise application development/," the firm writes.
>
> As you might expect, Adobe's FAQ document has generated some angry reaction
> from developers. One post, in reference to Adobe's comments about HTML 5,
> reads
>
> Tell me which enterprise will now invest in large-scale Flex project when
> Adobe makes that kind of statement on their official blog. I seriously can't
> understand at all why this has happened all of sudden, it's like a true
> nightmare.
>
> Another developer writes
> "/I've invested years developing significant proficiency in Flex. It now
> feels like a waste of time. I'm sure there are a lot of enterprise customers
> with large investments in Flex wondering the same thing. Why is there no
> clear migration plan? Why is Adobe abandoning Flex so suddenly? HTML5/JS/CSS
> still has significant issues with compatibility. We have built large,
> sophisticated rich internet applications that were only possible due to the
> ability of AS3 and Flex to support large scale object-oriented development.
> We don't build simple web apps, we build complex data visualization tools
> that our customers love. What are we going to tell our customers now? Sorry,
> Flex is dead and HTML5 isn't quite there yet, let's try again in a couple
> years?/"
>
> You can see the FAQ document here:
> http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html
> And the actual post this is from here:
> http://www.infoq.com/news/2011/11/flex-adandoned
>
> Interesting shake up in the web applications and general development.
> What next the entire flash platform?
>
> James
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://haxe.1354130.n2.nabble.com/Adobe-Donating-Flex-to-Open-Source-Foundation-Flex-Adandoned-tp6996328p6996328.html
> Sent from the Haxe mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>
> --
> haXe - an open source web programming language
> http://haxe.org
>

--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org


--
haXe - an open source web programming language
http://haxe.org